Connecticut History

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Albert Van Dusen Papers
Albert Van Dusen Papers
The collection is comprised of multiple types of materials, including Van Dusen's note cards, research notes, and photostats of historical documents for his various research projects. The collection contains materials primarily related to Van Dusen's published works, including Connecticut, The Public Records of the State of Connecticut and Puritans Against the Wilderness, Connecticut History to 1763. The bulk of the collection consists of research materials compiled by Van Dusen, focused on Connecticut Governor Jonathan Trumbull. These materials are primarily photostats and notes, consisting of copies of historical documents that Van Dusen collected from various research institutions and organized chronologically and thematically. The photostats contain copies of Trumbull's diaries and correspondence, as well as government documents related to Trumbull's time in political office. While the bulk of the collection consists of research materials, the collection contains a significant amount of Van Dusen's personal papers. These papers consist of administrative records, artwork, diaries, financial records, manuscripts, photographs, school records, sound recordings, and videocassettes, and include Van Dusen's academic correspondence with historical institutions, teaching materials, real estate info, office memos, and various non-research notes. Included in his personal papers are audio recordings, grant proposals, annual reports, history department newsletters, and materials associated with his position as the Connecticut State Historian. A much smaller portion of the collection pertain to Dr. Van Dusen's wife and research assistant, Wilda. All of the materials in the collection are from Van Dusen's time at the university, and the collection does not contain any documents produced by the subjects he studied. All of the photocopied documents in the collection are held at other research and archival institutions., The personal and research collection of UConn history professor and Connecticut State Historian Albert Van Dusen. The collection contains Van Dusen's note cards, research notes, and photostats of historical documents for his various research projects. The bulk of the collection consists of research materials compiled by Van Dusen, focused on Connecticut Governor Jonathan Trumbull., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Born in Vilas, North Carolina, on May 14, 1916, Albert Van Dusen spent most of his early years in Syracuse, New York where his father Albert P. Van Dusen was a professor of sociology. A graduate of Northwood School in Lake Placid, New York, Van Dusen came to Connecticut as a member of the class of 1938 at Wesleyan University. Inspired at Wesleyan by teachers such as George M. Dutcher and Hugh Brockunier, he went on to the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned his MA and Ph.D in history. During World War II, Van Dusen served in the U.S. Army and later taught in the U.S. Navy V-12 program while at Duke University. After the war, and brief stints as a visiting teacher at Wesleyan University and as a historian for the Department of the Army at the Pentagon, Van joined the history department at the University of Connecticut, where he taught from 1949 to 1983. During those 34 years, he introduced a series of courses on Connecticut and American colonial and revolutionary history and helped to establish the Ph.D program at the university. In 1952 Van Dusen was appointed Connecticut's State Historian by Governor John Lodge. He was recognized upon his retirement in 1985 with a public proclamation by Governor William O'Neill for his devoted service to the preservation of Connecticut's heritage. During those years, he produced numerous books and articles on Connecticut's history. His best known and most influential work, Connecticut, was a scholarly account of the state and its people from European arrival to 1960. Unfortunately, failing health prevented Van from completing the editing and publication of the voluminous papers of Connecticut's Revolutionary War governor, Jonathan Trumbull. Van Dusen was widely active in historical societies throughout New England and appeared on numerous radio and TV stations in Connecticut and New York in order to promote the study of local history. He worked to establish joint programs between the University of Connecticut, Sturbridge Village, and the Munson Institute at Mystic Seaport. He was a founder of the Mansfield Historical Society and the Association for the Study of Connecticut History, he chaired the publications committee of the Connecticut Historical Society, was on the education committees of both Sturbridge Village and Plimoth Plantation, and was an incorporator and trustee of the Stowe-Day Foundation. He was also an original member of the Connecticut State Historical Commission and served on both the Connecticut Historical Records Advisory Board and the American Revolution Bicentennial Commission of Connecticut. Albert Van Dusen died on November 26, 1999, after a lengthy illness., The records were donated by Dr. and Mrs. Van Dusen in several installments beginning in 1994 and continued by the Executor of their estate through 2011.
Allyn Fuller Collection
Allyn Fuller Collection
The Allyn Fuller Collection consists of papers and photographs collected by Fuller during his lifetime. The papers include train tickets, train orders, receipts, timetables, etc. The photographs show trains of the various railroads, plus scenes of railroad stations and town in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New York. The items are almost exclusively associated with New England railroads. The railroads represented include the Belfast and Moosehead Lake Railroad Company; the Berkshire Railroad Company; the Boston and Maine Railroad; the Canadian Pacific Railroad Company; the Central New England Railway Company; the Central New England and Western Railroad Company; the Clove Branch Rail Road Company; the Clove Springs Iron Works; the Connecticut and Passumpsic Railroad; the Connecticut Central Railroad Company; the Connecticut Western Railroad; the Danbury & Norwalk Railroad; the Dutchess and Columbia Railroad; the Edaville Railroad; the Fitchburg & Worcester Railroad; the Hartford and Connecticut Western Railroad; the Hartford and New Haven Railroad Company; the Hartford, Providence & Fishkill Railroad; the Housatonic Railroad Company; the Hudson River Day Line, the Lee and New Haven Railroad Company; the Long Island Railroad Company; the Manchester Railroad; the Naugatuck Railroad Company; the New Haven, Derby and Ansonia Railroad; the New London and Northern Railroad; the New York and Massachusetts Railway Company; the New York and New England Railroad; the New York, Boston, and Montreal Railroad; the New York, Providence & Boston Railroad; the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad; the Newburgh, Dutchess and Connecticut Railroad; the Old Colony Railroad; the Pennsylvania, Reading & New England Railroad; the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company; the Philadelphia, Reading & New England Railroad Company; the Poughkeepsie & Eastern Railroad Company; the Poughkeepsie Bridge Railroad Company; the Poughkeepsie, Hartford & Boston Railroad; the Rhinebeck and Connecticut Railroad; the Stockbridge and Pittsfield Railroad Company; and the Taunton Branch Railroad., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Donated by Sally Prestele, daughter of Allyn Fuller., [Item description, #:#], Allyn Fuller Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., Allyn Fuller, born in 1889, was a resident of Canaan, Connecticut. By profession, he was first a hardware store merchant and later a banker, but his passion was the history of railroads of New England, particularly those associated with the Central New England Railway, the Housatonic Railroad, and the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad. He died in 1971., The collection of Allyn Fuller, born in 1889, a resident of Canaan, Connecticut, and a railroad enthusiast.
American Brass Company Records
American Brass Company Records
The collection dates from circa 1800 to 1978 and provides a unique view of one of the major brass producers in the history of the United States. The materials vary in type from newspaper clippings to minute books and ledgers dating from the early 19th century., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The American Brass Company Records were donated by the Atlantic Richfield Corporation in 1988. The American Brass records were transferred from California to the University of Connecticut in 1988 when the corporate archives closed., [Item description, #:#], American Brass Company Records. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., The story of the development of the brass mills in the Naugatuck Valley is the story of 19th century entrepreneurs who would found one firm, merge with another, then reorganize again to form new ventures. The American Brass Company was no exception; it was founded from many segments of the industry including the Aaron Benedict Company (est. 1812) and the various Coe companies. Officially, the American Brass Company began 7 June 1893, when a group of men from five of the six brass mills in the Waterbury, Connecticut region, met to consolidate their interests. The new company was intended to be a holding company for the following operations: Plume & Atwood Manufacturing Company, Benedict & Burnham Manufacturing Company, Waterbury Brass Company, Scoville Manufacturing Company, Holmes, Booth and Haydens, and Coe Brass Manufacturing Company. However, it was to be another six years (1 March 1899) before the charter was accepted and the company finally organized. Even so, the principal companies could not agree upon remanufacturing activities. All of the companies, with the exception of the Waterbury Brass Company and the Coe Brass Manufacturing Company, withdrew from the newly formed consolidation. The Ansonia Brass & Copper Company (of the Phelps Dodge family) joined the remaining two, and on 14 December 1899 the three companies-- Ansonia Brass & Copper, Waterbury Brass and Coe Brass Manufacturing--formed the American Brass Company. By 1901, Benedict & Burnham and Holmes, Booth and Haydens had rejoined the venture and the American Brass Company was on its way. The next two decades would bring major reorganizations to the company. On 1 January 1912, the holding company became an operating company and the associated companies were now divisions of the parent, American Brass Company. In 1922, the Anaconda Copper Mining Company (of Montana) acquired American Brass, although the company retained its own identity until 1960 when the name was changed to Anaconda American Brass. The Anaconda Company merged with Atlantic Richfield in 1977. The American Brass files housed at the corporate archives were transferred to Los Angeles, California, in 1981 when the headquarters of Anaconda American Brass Company were moved from Waterbury, Connecticut to Rolling Meadows, Illinois. The name of the division was subsequently changed to ARCO Metals. No administrative correspondence or records groups remained at Waterbury and the collection was divided into logical series at the corporate archives., The American Brass Company was founded in 1893 with the consolidation of five existing brass mills in the Waterbury, Connecticut area. Intended as a holding company, American Brass absorbed the following companies: Plume & Atwood Manufacturing, Benedict & Burnham Manufacturing, Waterbury Brass, Scoville Manufacturing, Holmes, Booth and Haydens, and Coe Brass Manufacturing. The collection dates from circa 1800 to 1978 and provides a unique view of one of the major brass producers in the history of the United States. The materials vary in type from newspaper clippings to minute books and ledgers dating from the early 19th century.
American Montessori Society Records
American Montessori Society Records
The documents in the American Montessori Society ( AMS) Records extend from the mid-1950s through the mid-1990s, though the bulk falls between 1960 and 1985. They encompass a variety of subjects and activities, including routine administrative and financial records, research, historical correspondence and writings, official publications, and publicity. The early history of AMS appears in Series VI, VII, and VIII, which include Board of Directors' minutes, financial reports, articles on the Montessori movement and AMS, and correspondence among key figures in the movement and organization. These papers chronicle the founding of AMS in connection with Whitby School in Greenwich, Connecticut; the difficult relationship between AMS and the Association Montessori Internationale ( AMI); and the problems AMS had to confront as it established its reputation and authority as a promoter of Montessori education. Especially important in this regard are the files of Nancy McCormick Rambusch (Series VII), the founder of AMS; this series provides historical information not only about AMS but also about the personal and professional life of Rambusch as revealed in correspondence, research, articles, and interviews. AMS's minutes and bylaws may be found in Series I and II, respectively. Series II though is incomplete. Minutes are also included in the records found in Series IV and VI. The Administrative Files (Series III) deal with professional and operational administrative aspects of AMS and some of its committees and progr AMS. They include, among other documents, a policy statement (1963), correspondence of the Educational Advisory Committee, fundraising appeals and brochures, drafts of the AMS Management Guide, and correspondence and legal information about evaluating the credentials of foreign Montessori teacher trainees. There are also leases and maintenance correspondence for the AMS offices in New York, and personnel correspondence about insurance progr AMS for Montessori teachers. The Mailings Scrapbooks in Series IV contain the letters, publicity, publications, and other literature generated by AMS and sent to its members and Board members during 1974-1983, affording a general overview of the society's functions and activities for that period. Series XV also contains scrapbooks of AMS's public-relations efforts as it sought to advertise its mission, and includes lists of AMS publications and materials. AMS also sought outreach through films, and the correspondence, scripts, and publicity for several film projects will be found in Series XVI. Historical background and information on the Montessori movement and its founder will be found in Series X. Writings by and about Maria Montessori, transcripts of her historic lectures given in California in 1915, and articles about the history and evolution of the method both in general and in the United States are included; many of these papers were donated to the society by Montessori educators and supporters. As the movement gained momentum, Montessori educators and scholars conducted and published research on a variety of relevant educational topics. The AMS office collected various papers, articles, bibliographies, and abstracts to serve as an in-house resource for Montessori scholarship, and these will be found in Series XI. Although they date largely from the 1960s and thus do not reflect the most current research, they provide a glimpse of the state of American Montessori studies at the time. Series IX contains pedagogical resources that show how Montessori education was actually conducted in the classroom, including lesson plans, outlines, and the Teacher's Manual for the 1966-1976 Teacher Training Program. AMS published numerous journals, newsletters, and other publications, and many of these appear in Series XIV. All the titles represented contain significant gaps but still permit the reader to grasp the scope of the organization's activities and interests through the years. Non- AMS publications will be found in Series XXI, and include writings on Montessorian topics by organizations other than AMS, including AMI. Of particular interest is Mario Montessori's "yellow paper," which set forth AMI's philosophical disagreements with AMS in the early 1960s. AMS encouraged affiliation by Montessori schools, and this topic is covered in Series XVII, which contains lists of affiliates, bylaws and administrative forms of individual schools, statistical data, and various brochures and other information regarding affiliated schools in general and also specific schools. One of the ways AMS sought to cement ties between affiliates and the national society was through the Consultation Program, the records of which are located in Series XII. They include general correspondence as well as files of individual consultants and several coordinators of the Program, and offer insights into the operations of this important group. The activities of the Comite Hispano Montessori, an association for Spanish-speaking Montessorians in North, Central, and South America as well as the Caribbean, are reflected in the correspondence, publicity, directories, and consultation reports that comprise Series XIX. In Series XIII are located files for various national and regional seminars from 1963-1990. Registration lists, correspondence dealing with exhibitors and presenters, brochures and programs, financial reports and records, and evaluation questionnaires allow an understanding of the importance of these meetings as vehicles for fostering, maintaining, and developing aspects of the Montessori method. AMS also interacted with organizations and concerns not directly within the Montessori orbit. Series V chronicles the relationship between AMS and government agencies, especially the Pennsylvania Department of Education, as the society sought to achieve official recognition of Montessori teacher-training methods and educational instruction. AMS's connections with other groups relevant to its interests are depicted in Series XX, which includes articles, brochures, and correspondence. Represented are day-care and home-schooling organizations, educational toy companies, and Waldorf Institutes. Series 18 is devoted to the Child Development Associate Consortium ( CDAC), of which AMS eventually became a member. Audiocassettes, audiotapes, CDs and phonograph records are located in Series XXII. The tapes and cassettes contain lectures, speeches, and workshops conducted mainly at various AMS seminars from the 1960s through the 1980s. Films and videocassettes about various aspects of the Montessori method are located in Series XXIII. Of interest is an interview with Nancy McCormick Rambusch and Cleo Monson about the beginnings of AMS, taped in 1986. Photographs and slides are included in Series XXIV. The slides illustrate Montessori teaching activities and events, such as the Montessori Centennial Celebration in 1970. The photographs cover a wide range of professional and social activities, including seminars. Depicted are many of the individuals, including Nancy McCormick Rambusch, who are represented in the papers of the collection. Later additions to the collection are included in Series XXV to XXIX., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Maria Montessori ( 1870-1952), the first woman in Italy to receive a medical degree from the University of Rome, developed her theories of education at the turn of the century while working as a young doctor in an asylum for mentally disabled children. In the Montessori method, children use special learning materials in a prepared environment to sequentially develop and master concepts and motor skills. Teachers guide but do not control, each child progresses at his or her own pace, and the noncompetitive atmosphere of the classroom allows working for the pleasure of learning rather than from fear of punishment or anticipation of rewards. Dr. Montessori developed an international following, and in 1913 and 1915 she toured the United States, lecturing on her educational theories to enthusiastic acclaim. Yet by the 1920s her ideas had been rejected by mainstream American educators. This effectively killed the Montessori movement in the United States for the next several decades, although it continued to flourish in Europe, especially among Catholic educational institutions. In the late 1950s Nancy McCormick Rambusch, a young teacher who had undergone Montessori training in London, became inspired with the idea of reviving Montessori education in America. Initially conducting classes from her New York apartment, she soon founded and became headmistress of Whitby, a lay-Catholic school in Greenwich, Connecticut, which became the flagship school of the American Montessori revival. Rambusch and Whitby gained a reputation and supporters; they and the Montessori method soon became the subjects of articles and interviews in both Catholic and secular journals and magazines. They also attracted the attention of the Association Montessori Internationale ( AMI), the guardian and promulgator of Maria Montessori's ideals under the directorship of her son, Mario, who authorized Rambusch to act as AMI's representative in America. This led, in 1960, to the founding of the American Montessori Society ( AMS), with Rambusch as its first president. During the early years the fortunes of AMS and Whitby School were intertwined; the two institutions even shared Board members. Although Rambusch was active in Catholic circles, she recognized that Montessori had to transcend religious boundaries and would have to acquire nonsectarian appeal if it was to succeed in the United States. She also firmly believed that aspects of the Montessori method had to be modified to accommodate the culture of mid-twentieth- century America and its children, and that the movement should not be confined to private institutions. These ideas strained relations with AMI, which felt that Dr. Montessori's principles were universal and could not be modified without destroying their integrity. Despite good-faith attempts on both sides, the philosophical differences could not be reconciled, while additional controversies over finances and control deepened the rift. Ultimately, in 1963, AMI withdrew its recognition of AMS as a Montessori society, and from that point until the present AMS has existed independently of AMI. Nineteen-sixty-three was a critical year for AMS. Nancy McCormick Rambusch had been travelling around the country tirelessly promoting Montessori and drumming up support among educators and parents. The results were overwhelmingly positive: the number of Montessori schools in America increased and the AMS office in Greenwich was flooded with requests for information about the method and about how to open Montessori schools. The society was weakened, however, by conflicts not only with AMI but within AMS itself. Moreover, the administrative affairs of the office were in chaos, and the organization was in danger of disintegrating. This situation was remedied when Cleo Monson was hired in January 1963 as Executive Secretary to reorganize AMS's office, but her administrative abilities soon rendered her indispensable as the coordinator of virtually all the society's activities. In 1973 she became the first National Director, a position of pivotal importance that she essentially created and that she held until her retirement in 1978. In her own way she was as responsible as Nancy McCormick Rambusch for the existence of AMS. In 1963, six months after Monson arrived, Rambusch resigned as president and embarked upon a distinguished career in children's education that continued until her death in 1994. Also in 1963, the national office of AMS moved from Greenwich to New York, where it has since remained. Following the turbulence of these early years, AMS found firmer footing and began to flourish. As the society grew, it had to cope with the practical issues that face all organizations, including fundraising, formation of policies, codification of professional standards and ethics, and public relations, both within and without the Montessori community. Various committees and programs sprang into existence to meet these needs, and this required the talents and resources of members willing to organize and direct these important activities. Within a decade of its existence, therefore, AMS's internal structure necessarily increased in complexity. Yet the society continued to avoid bureaucracy as much as possible by using the main office in New York as a coordinating hub. Because Montessori schools were not required to affiliate with the national organization, AMS sought to establish relationships with local schools through various forms of outreach. It published literature about the Montessori method and AMS, collected research, some of which appeared in the society's various journals and newsletters, and established the Consultation Program, in which trained consultants would visit affiliated schools, observe classes and the physical environment, and offer suggestions and feedback. AMS developed standards for teacher training and certification as well as pedagogical resources to meet Montessori educational needs. AMS's seminars and conferences also served to foster communication, professional growth, and a shared sense of identity among Montessori teachers. A national seminar was held annually, and several regional conferences took place each year. These meetings featured lectures, workshops, presentations, and exhibits, and allowed members to network, exchange ideas, and develop or hone their teaching skills. Portions of these seminars were recorded or filmed to serve as future resources. The society was very proud of the success of its first International Symposium, held in Athens in 1979, which featured as speakers several internationally renowned educators and scholars. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, AMS constantly sought to widen its appeal. Its ties with the Comite Hispano Montessori, for instance, enabled the Montessori method and resources to thrive in Spanish-speaking communities in the Americas and the Caribbean. AMS collected literature from and established relationships with other educational groups and organizations, including the National Association for the Education of Young Children and the Child Development Associate Consortium, and concerned itself with home schooling, day care, and alternative educational methods such as the Waldorf Institutes. In this way it attempted to keep abreast of contemporary developments in children's education and resist parochialism by entering into dialogue with those who shared AMS's concerns for the educational welfare of children. AMS succeeded in reviving the Montessori method in the United States and gaining recognition for it as a valid educational system. The society has become the foremost resource in America for Montessori education and teacher training. Through its varied activities it continues to provide information, support, and advice to schools, teachers, and parents, and to integrate the ideas of Maria Montessori and her many followers into the structure of American education., The collection was transferred in 2006 to Archives & Special Collections by the American Montessori Society, in coordination with Special Collections at Columbia Teachers College. Ongoing donations from AMS and individuals are integrated regularly., The American Montessori Society (AMS) Records document the history of an important American educational organization, and consist of printed, typescript, and handwritten materials; sound recordings; films; photographs; and slides. The collection, although not complete, reflects AMS's professional and administrative activities and also provides historical information about the Montessori system of education in general.
Belding Brothers and Company Records
Belding Brothers and Company Records
The eight folders in the collection contain correspondence from A.N. Belding and from M.M. Belding to W. P. Hetherington, their agent in Belding, MI. The letters date 1893, 1896, 1899-1903. The correspondence indicates the range of the Belding Brothers and Company interests including: Belding Building Loan Association, Belding Land Improvement Company, Hotel Belding, Citizens Electric Light Company, and other business concerns. The letters show the Belding brothers' relations with the city, their interest in city politics, as well as mill employee relations and Belding's discriminatory property leasing practices., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The Belding Brothers and Company were silk manufacturers in Rockville, CT, with additional mills in Northampton, MA, Belding, MI, San Francisco, CA, and Montreal, Canada; the brothers had extensive business interests., The records were donated in April 1989 by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History., Belding Brothers and Company were silk manufacturers in Rockville, Connecticut, with additional mills in Northampton, Massachusetts, Belding, Michigan, San Francisco, California, and Montreal, Canada.
Bristol Brass Company Records
Bristol Brass Company Records
The Bristol Brass Company was founded as the Bristol Brass and Clock Company in 1850, the creation of sixteen industrialists from Bristol clock and Waterbury brass interests who hoped to profit in the booming clock industry of Bristol, CT. Although the company never manufactured clocks, only the brass mechanisms for the timepieces, it was many years before it changed its name to Bristol Brass Company. It was the largest employer in Bristol, with 375 employees by 1880. Its mainstay was the production of brass for automobiles. The company thrived during the years of World Wars I and II, making shell cases for the military. The post-war economy brought a change in the company's fortunes. The amount of brass used in automobiles declined swiftly, and foreign competition eroded the company's clientele. Bristol Brass closed its doors in December 1982, after 132 years as a major part of the Bristol economy., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The Bristol Brass Company was founded as the Bristol Brass and Clock Company in 1850, the creation of sixteen industrialists from Bristol clock and Waterbury brass interests who hoped to profit in the booming clock industry of Bristol, CT. Although the company never manufactured clocks, only the brass mechanisms for the timepieces, it was many years before it changed its name to Bristol Brass Company. Starting with only sixteen workers, the company had become the largest employer in Bristol with 375 employees by 1880. By the turn of the century, it produced a variety of goods ranging from lamps for railroad passenger cares, souvenir spoons, and sterling silver flatware. During World War I, the company prospered as the mill worked around the clock to produce war materials such as brass cartridge cases, bullet jackets, shells, truck parts, and ship fittings. In 1915, a new rolling mill was built at the plant to accommodate this increased expansion and a work force that had grown from 300 in 1914 to 1,000 in 1918. The company, however, had severely overextended itself during the war years and it suffered from the drastic reduction in armament production and the recession that followed the Armistice. Deeply in debt, the company was forced to sell its spoon and cutlery shops to the American Brass Company of Waterbury. The company rebounded from its slump and sales soared when it began making parts for the burgeoning automobile industry in the 1920s. It produced radiator tanks, tubing, and other parts used in automobile manufacturing. The company also updated its facilities to meet expanding demand. The manufacture of brass was put on an assembly line basis that increased production and reduced labor costs. New machines, electric furnaces (to replace steam-generated ones), and even scientific research laboratories were installed in this effort to modernize the plant. The Great Depression marked the end of these boom years for Bristol Brass. By 1932, the company had laid off one-third of its workers and those still employed were working shorter weeks at less pay. The National Recovery Act codes of the New Deal allowed the company to turn some profit in 1933 and it also benefited from a modest recovery in the automobile industry in the late 1920s, but the recession of 1937-1938 again brought a downturn in the company's fortunes. Only the increased military spending of World War II brought good times back to Bristol Brass. Its main product during the war was shell cases. Organized labor established itself as a permanent fixture at Bristol Brass during the war when the employees joined the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers. After the war, when many unions conducted anti-Communist purges, this union was replaced by the more moderate and less politically active Local 1500 of the United Auto Workers. Like many manufacturing companies, Bristol Brass struggled in the post-war economy. The amount of brass used in automobiles declined over the years and the brass industry soon became a victim of foreign competition. The disastrous slump in the automobile industry during the 1970s only further hastened the decline of Bristol Brass. By the early 1980s, the company was on the verge of bankruptcy as a national recession and a general overall decline in manufacturing in New England diminished its profits. The company was deeply in debt and unable to pay its workers, which, by the Spring of 1982, numbered only 200. It closed its doors for good in December 1982 after 132 years as a major part of the Bristol economy., The collection was given to the University of Connecticut by the Bristol Brass Liquidating Corporation on 30 December 1982., The Bristol Brass Company was founded as the Bristol Brass and Clock Company in 1850, the creation of sixteen industrialists from Bristol clock and Waterbury brass interests who hoped to profit in the booming clock industry of Bristol, CT. Although the company never manufactured clocks, only the brass mechanisms for the timepieces, it was many years before it changed its name to Bristol Brass Company. It was the largest employer in Bristol, with 375 employees by 1880. Its mainstay was the production of brass for automobiles. The company thrived during the years of World Wars I and II, making shell cases for the military. The post-war economy brought a change in the company's fortunes. The amount of brass used in automobiles declined swiftly, and foreign competition eroded the company's clientele. Bristol Brass closed its doors in December 1982, after 132 years as a major part of the Bristol economy.
Bruce A. Morrison Papers
Bruce A. Morrison Papers
The Bruce Morrison Papers contain the office files of four legislative assistants to Mr. Morrison during his Congressional membership from 1983-1990, including documentation of his campaigns, as well as constituent correspondence for the period; his unsuccessful campaign for governor of Connecticut in 1990; his association with the Federal Housing Finance Board (FHFB) from 1995 through 2000; and his involvement with the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform, also named the "Jordan Commission" after its chairwoman Barbara Jordan. The collection further documents his work to mobilize the Irish vote in support of Bill Clinton during the 1992 presidential campaign through the group Irish-Americans for Clinton/Gore as well as other issues relating to Ireland and the Irish people., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Bruce Morrison is Chairman of the Morrison Public Affairs Group (MPAG), which he founded in 2001 to conduct and supervise a broad practice involving strategic advice and representation for both domestic and international clients. His work involves advocacy in both Congress and the Executive branch, as well as building alliances within the private sector. His areas of expertise include immigration policy, financial services, housing finance, privacy, and intellectual property. Prior to founding MPAG, he was Vice Chairman of the Washington office of GPC International. From 1995 to 2000, Mr. Morrison served as Chairman of the Federal Housing Finance Board, an independent agency regulating the twelve Federal Home Loan Banks, a wholesale banking system with assets in excess of $600 billion. In this role, he developed and implemented a far-reaching strategy to modernize the business of the Banks. His work included the successful advocacy of the passage of the Federal Home Loan Bank Modernization Act of 1999, a bi-partisan effort which provided for new powers for the Banks, devolution of management, and a modern risk-based capital structure. Mr. Morrison provided the Banks with new business opportunities in housing finance and economic development through pilot programs and regulatory innovations. He spearheaded the agency through an aggressive regulatory agenda in the first six months of 2000 to implement the statutory changes and institutionalize the expanded authority of the Banks. From 1983 to 1991, Mr. Morrison represented the Third District of Connecticut (New Haven) in the U.S. House of Representatives. He served on the Banking Committee, playing a leadership role in financial services oversight, housing and housing finance, and U.S. policy regarding the World Bank, the IMF, and the LDC debt crisis. He also served on the Judiciary Committee, where he specialized in intellectual property issues, bankruptcy law, consumer protection policy, including privacy, and immigration. As chairman of the Immigration Subcommittee, he led the passage of the Immigration Act of 1990, a comprehensive reform, which included expanded admission of skilled workers. He also served on the committees on Veterans Affairs and the District of Columbia, and on the Select Committee on Children, Youth and Families. Mr. Morrison was the Democratic candidate for Governor of Connecticut in 1990. From 1991 to 1995, he was a partner in the law firm of Morrison & Swaine, specializing in immigration and international trade and investment. In 1992 and 1996, he was Co-Chairman of Irish- Americans for Clinton-Gore, and served throughout the Clinton Administration as an advisor and intermediary in the Irish peace process. From 1992 to 1995, he was a member of the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform. Mr. Morrison holds a bachelor's degree in chemistry from MIT and a master's degree in organic chemistry from the University of Illinois. He is a graduate of the Yale Law School., The papers were donated to the University of Connecticut libraries by Bruce A. Morrison in December 1990. Additional materials were donated in 1994 and 2000., The Bruce Morrison Papers contain the office files of four legislative assistants to Mr. Morrison during his Congressional membership from 1983-1990, including documentation of his campaigns, as well as constituent correspondence for the period; his unsuccessful campaign for governor of Connecticut in 1990; his association with the Federal Housing Finance Board (FHFB) from 1995 through 2000; and his involvement with the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform, also named the "Jordan Commission" after its chairwoman Barbara Jordan. The collection further documents his work to mobilize the Irish vote in support of Bill Clinton during the 1992 presidential campaign through the group Irish-Americans for Clinton/Gore as well as other issues relating to Ireland and the Irish people.
Charles B. Gunn Collection
Charles B. Gunn Collection
The Charles B. Gunn Collection consists of papers produced by and about Gunn, as well as materials he collected of historical information about the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, Penn Central, Amtrak, and Conrail. The collection includes photographs taken by Gunn when he served as official photographer for the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, in the mid-1950s., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The records were donated by Charles B. Gunn in 1988. A large addition of photographs of railroad stations in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, most of them taken by Mr. Gunn in the mid-1950s, was donated by Mr. Robert N. Uricchio of Newington, Connecticut, in 2004. The materials were created or collected by Charles B. Gunn prior to their donation to Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., [Item description, #:#], Charles B. Gunn Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., Charles B. Gunn was born on April 10, 1918, and grew up in New Haven, Connecticut. In 1936 he began his forty-four year railroad career as a clerk with the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company. Over the years he worked for many departments of the company, including Accounting, Materials Accounting, Public Relations, Methods and Procedures, and the General Storekeeper's Office. His only time away from employment with the company was when he served for three and a half years in the Army during World War II. Gunn is best known, though, as the official company photographer during the years of the Patrick B. McGinnis presidency of 1954 to 1956. Gunn traveled with McGinnis on inspection trips of the railroad line. He took hundreds of photographs of the devastation to railroad property and towns along the railroad routes from the floods of August and October 1955. After McGinnis left the company in January 1956 Gunn's position as official photographer was eliminated and he returned to work with other company departments, though he never stopped taking photographs of locomotives, stations, and other railroad-related scenes. Gunn was still working for the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company when it collapsed and emerged as a part of Penn Central on January 1, 1969. Penn Central soon disintegrated to become Conrail and Amtrak. Gunn retired in 1980 but continued to work as a professional photographer of weddings and church events and as an active promoter of the history of southern New England railroads. He regularly attended railroad shows and sold prints of the photographs he produced for the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. Charles B. Gunn died on April 12, 2002., The Charles B. Gunn Collection consists of papers produced by and about Gunn, as well as materials he collected of historical information about the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, Penn Central, Amtrak, and Conrail. The collection includes photographs taken by Gunn when he served as official photographer for the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, in the mid-1950s.
Chase Going Woodhouse Papers
Chase Going Woodhouse Papers
The Chase Going Woodhouse Papers reflect Mrs. Woodhouse's activities and interests including family and women's issues, service to the state of Connecticut and people in her community, and her professional life. Materials include correspondence, reports, speeches, articles, photographs, notes, publications, and newsletters., Born in Victoria, British Columbia in 1890 the daughter of Seymour and Harriet Jackson Going, Chase Going Woodhouse studied at McGill University, the University of Berlin and the University of Chicago. She was employed by Smith College, U.S. Department of Agriculture, the University of North Carolina, Connecticut College before her election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1945. For much of the remainder of her career she served as the Director's of the Auerbach Women's Service Bureau (1945-1981). Chase Going Woodhouse died in 1984 after a lifetime of dedicated public service., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Born in Victoria, British Columbia in 1890 the daughter of Seymour and Harriet Jackson Going, Chase Going Woodhouse received a B.A. (1912) and M.A. (Economics, 1913) from McGill University. She studied for her Ph.D. at the University of Berlin (Germany, 1913-1914) and the University of Chicago (1915-1916) and was named a Fellow in Political Economy at the University of Chicago in 1917. Married that same year to Edward James Woodhouse, she accepted a position at Smith College, where she taught from 1917 until 1925. After three years as a Senior Economist of the Division of Economics of the Bureau of Home Economics of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (1925-1928), Woodhouse returned to academia as the Director of Personnel, Woman's College, at the University of North Carolina (1928-1934). In 1934, she accepted the position of Professor economics at Connecticut College, a position she held for ten years. From 1941-1943 she also served as the Secretary of the State of Connecticut and published a book, The Big Store, in 1943. Woodhouse was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1945 and served two terms (1945-1947, 1949-1951). For much of the remainder of her career she served as the Director of the Auerbach Women's Service Bureau (1945-1981). Chase Going Woodhouse died in 1984 after a lifetime of dedicated public service., Chase Going Woodhouse donated her papers to the University of Connecticut Library in April, 1983.
Cheney Brothers Silk Manufacturing Company Records
Cheney Brothers Silk Manufacturing Company Records
The collection contains materials relevant to the production and sale of silk—administrative, financial, production and employee records, in addition to fabric samples, publications, reports and photographs. The administrative files contain minutes, historical information on the founding of the company and its growth, company produced handbooks and manuals, employee publications, sales records and a variety of publications related to textiles and labor. These files also contain information pertaining to government contract work, wages, and inter-office communications. Personnel records contain information about Pioneer Parachute Company, a subsidiary, and its efforts to recruit employees during World War II and the early 1950s. Other files concern the cafeteria arrangements of the company, reinstated union employees and the forgery case of Henry de Wald, a company employee. Monthly and yearly accident tabulations, reports and related documents are included in this series as are wages, hiring specifications and employee records. The specifications materials describes equipment, materials and duties connected with each position within the Ribbon, Spinning and Dressing departments and the Throwing mill. Each position description includes a black and white photograph (ca. 1920s) showing the appropriate machine and its operator. The employee records cards contain detailed personal information on all non-management employees (1900-1960). The labor files contain materials relevant to the Mill and its interaction with Local 63 of the Textile Workers Union of America. Also included are publications and information pertaining to federal labor laws and newspaper clippings., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, In 1838, six Cheney brothers established the Mount Nebo Silk Company in Manchester, CT. The company adopted the family name in 1843. Aided by booming national markets, a protective tariff, and innovative production methods, the company grew into the nation's largest and most profitable silk mill by the late 1880s. The company pioneered the waste-silk spinning method and the Grant's reel. At the beginning of World War I, the company employed over 4,700 workers. One out of every four Manchester residents worked at the Cheney Mills in some capacity. The company was an integral part of the community, its domain taking in over 175 acres, including mills buildings, churches, houses, schools, recreation centers, utility companies, and even a railroad. The company was also known nationally for its benevolent system of welfare capitalism. It was one of the first textile mills to use Frederick Taylor's methods of scientific management. In its early years, the company relied mostly on native-born American labor, but throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the company actively recruited both skilled and unskilled immigrant labor. By the 1920s, foreign worker dominated the labor force. The company reached its peak in 1923, after which it quickly declined due to industry-wide overproduction and competition from new synthetic fibers such as rayon. During the Depression, the company was forced to borrow heavily to keep the mills running. In 1933, it sold its rail lines and utility companies. The 1930s was also a period of increased labor strife. The company successfully resisted unionization until 1934 when it was forced to accept the United Textile Workers as the bargaining representative of the workers. The company was forced to declare bankruptcy in 1937. The Second World War brought a temporary recovery in the form of silk parachute production for the war effort; however, after the war, outmoded plant facilities, high labor costs, and strong competition from southern mills forced the Cheney family to sell the company to the textile giant, J. P. Stevens & Company in 1955. J. P. Stevens quickly sold off or destroyed most of the machinery and equipment which produced goods competitive with other Stevens-owned mills. Cheney Brothers was eventually sold to Gerli Incorporated of New York. In 1978, the mills and surrounding neighborhood were declared a National Historical Landmark District. The mills lingered on in this truncated condition until 1984 when it was closed permanently. Most of the mill buildings were sold to developers who converted them into luxury apartments and offices. Additional historical information is located in the collection file. Please contact a staff member for further information., The employee records and other materials were donated by Gerli and Company to the University of Connecticut in April 1984. Included in this original donation were personnel records, employee record cards, union negotiations materials, fabric samples and photographs. The Cheney Brothers Silk Manufacturing Company financial and executive records, including minutes of Director's meetings and account books, were donated by the Connecticut Historical Society in October 1984., In 1838, six Cheney brothers established the Mount Nebo Silk Company in Manchester, CT. The company adopted the family name in 1843. Aided by booming national markets, a protective tariff, and innovative production methods, the company grew into the nation's largest and most profitable silk mill by the late 1880s. The company pioneered the wastesilk spinning method and the Grant's reel. The company reached its peak in 1923, after which it quickly declined due to industry wide overproduction and competition from new synthetic fibers such as rayon. Although it revived slightly during World War II, the family sold the company to J. P. Stevens and Company in 1955. J. P. Stevens quickly liquidated the equipment and the remainder was sold to Gerli Incorporated of New York. In 1978, the mills and surrounding neighborhood were declared a National Historical Landmark District. The mill was permanently closed in 1984. Most of the mill buildings were sold to developers who converted them into luxury apartments and offices.
Connecticut Census materials
Connecticut Census materials
City Block maps and data for Connecticut cities., City Block maps and data for Connecticut cities., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries
Connecticut Federal Writer's Project (Works Projects Administration)
Connecticut Federal Writer's Project (Works Projects Administration)
Individual narratives and life histories and studies of customs of social and ethnic groups residing in Connecticut., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The Federal Writers' Project was created in 1935 as part of the United States Work Progress Administration to provide employment for historians, teachers, writers, librarians, and other white-collar workers. Originally, the purpose of the project was to produce a series of sectional guide books under the name American Guide, focusing on the scenic, historical, cultural, and economic resources of the United States. Eventually the new programs developed and projects begun under the Federal Emergency Relief Administration were absorbed by the writers' project. The materials for Connecticut reflect areas of interest developed by the project, especially rural and urban folklore, including individual narratives and life histories and studies of customs of social and ethnic groups., Individual narratives and life histories and studies of customs of social and ethnic groups residing in Connecticut created under the auspices of the Federal Writers' Project.
Connecticut Historic Preservation Collection
Connecticut Historic Preservation Collection
The collection consists of archaeological surveys, historical and architectural surveys, documentation studies of properties, and maps, produced for the Connecticut Historical Commission by archaeologists and historians. Other materials include books, CDs, posters, and pamphlets.Architectural Surveys:Most of the historical and architectural surveys were completed by selected towns in the state to inventory properties they deemed historical and noteworthy. These surveys often determined which properties would be eligible for submission to the National Register of Historic Places. Please note that the forms for the NRHP submissions are not kept with the CHPC; they are kept at Connecticut's Division of Culture and Tourism, in Hartford.Archaeological Surveys:The Connecticut State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) describes the archaeological survey process in this manner:The National Historic Preservation Act mandates that all federally funded, assisted, licensed and/or permitted projects be reviewed by the Connecticut State Historic Preservation Office. As such, they review 1,200 to 1,500 proposed projects annually and, depending upon specific project location, will require the federal agency (or permit applicant) to employ a professional archaeological consultant to conduct appropriate historic and archaeological studies. Approximately seventy percent of the archaeological reports are generated from the federal review process.The Connecticut Environmental Policy Act (CEPA) mandates that state agencies coordinate with SHPO regarding the consideration of historic and archaeological resources as part of project planning and development. Unlike the federal process, state agency assisted, permitted or licensed projects are exempt from the historical commission's review. It is only when the state agency proposes an action (such as, for example, a new campus building, changes in a state park, construction of a new prison) that SHPO has an opportunity to review and comment. Also, any proposed archaeological investigation on state lands (whether CEPA-related or academic research) requires a permit from the office. About ten percent of the CHPC archaeological reports are generated in this manner.About thirty town governments have enacted Planning and Zoning regulations that require developers to consult with the State Archaeologist regarding archaeological sensitivity of proposed subdivisions. In turn, the State Archaeologist may require the developer to hire an archaeological consultant. Also, towns have chosen to require archaeological surveys, irrespective of its regulations, for especially complex or controversial projects as an important way to gather additional information about a proposed development area. This generates about ten percent of CHPC reports.The last ten percent represents projects that tribal governments, town governments, and/or private property owners have commissioned to acquire baseline data about their respective properties. Other surveys may be generated as academic research projects (thesis-related).[Thanks to David Poirier, former Staff Archeologist of the Connecticut Historical Commission, for the above description of the survey process.]Documentation Studies:Documentation studies are generated when a federal or Connecticut-funded project has to take into account its affects on historical archeaological resources. The studies document the "before" structure or when changes in the structure mitigate adverse effects of changing or destroying the building. If the building is considered irreplaceable or very important historically then the State Historic Preservation Office decides whether or not to allow the project to proceed., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The surveys, studies, books, and other materials, were initially donated by the Connecticut Historical Commission in 1984. Additions to the surveys are made on a continuing basis, as they are generated by the archaeologists and historians who provide them for the State Historic Preservation Office., [Item description, CHPC no.], Connecticut Historic Preservation Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., The Connecticut Historical Commission was established in 1955 as a state agency, and was mandated when the National Historic Preservation Act required every state to appoint a State Historic Preservation Officer and establish a State Historic Preservation Office. In 2003 Connecticut established the Division on Culture and Tourism which combined the state's historical commission, the Commission on the Arts, the Film Office and the Tourism Office. The division administers the State Register of Historic Places as well as federally funded National Register-based programs designed to identify, register, and protect the buildings, sites, structures, districts, and objects that comprise and define Connecticut's cultural heritage. The CHC also possesses regulatory authority for all archaeological studies undertaken on state lands or within state-administered waters., The Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism’s State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and the Office of Connecticut State Archaeology are the lead agencies for the preservation of the state's archaeological and architectural historic heritage. This guide provides references to documentary, architectural and archaeological survey reports conducted in accordance with federal, state, and local regulations regarding cultural resource protection, provided by SHPO, and is intended to provide researchers with an overview of the available literature and completed surveys. The surveys are organized by the 169 Connecticut towns, as well as sections for Statewide, Regional or Thematic surveys, and thereunder within four catagories of types of surveys -- Historical and Architectural, Archaeological, Documentation Studies, and Maps. Other materials include books, CDs, posters, and pamphlets.
Connecticut Soldiers Collection
Connecticut Soldiers Collection
The collection, at present, contains several diaries and the papers of multiple servicemen active in the American Civil War, World War I, World War II and Korea., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The materials have been acquired by purchase and gift, An artificial collection, the Connecticut Soldiers Collection was created to provide a starting point for research concerning the experiences of Connecticut servicemen from the Civil War through World War II. The sources for the materials are provided in the collection.
Connecticut Soldiers' Orphans Home
Connecticut Soldiers' Orphans Home
One manuscript volume of daily activities at the Home, recorded by the Secretary of the Home, T. S. Gold., The General Assembly chartered the Connecticut Soldiers' Orphans' Home in May 1864. Edwin Whitney of Mansfield, 'who had nearly completed a fine large building for a boys' school, offered this building with the farm of fifty acres, all valued at $12,000 or $15,000, as a gift to the Home.' Edwin Whitney conveyed by deed, title to the property to the Connecticut Soldiers' Orphans' Home, September 24, 1866. Mr. Gold was the first, and apparently the only, secretary of the Home during its existence from October, 1866, to May, 1875., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The Daily Journal is part of the collection located at the Mansfield Historical Society, 954 Storrs Road, Storrs, CT (http://www.mansfieldct-history.org/).
Connecticut Street Railroad Photograph Album
Connecticut Street Railroad Photograph Album
The album consists of 685 photographs of cars and scenes of street railroads in Connecticut. Street railroads, as identified in the album, include the New Haven & Shore Line Railway, Groton-Stonington-Westerly Railway, Taftville Mills Connection, Norwich & Westerly Traction Company, Bristol Traction Company, People Tramway Company ( Putnam, Connecticut), Lordship Railway (Bridgeport), New London- East Lyme Street Railway, Worcester-Connecticut Eastern Railway, Manufacturer's Railroad (New Haven), Connecticut Railway & Lighting Company, Central Railway & Electric Company, Winsted & Torrington Street Railway, Bristol & Plainville Tramway, and Waterbury & Milldale Tramway Company. Connecticut Company divisions include Norwich, New Haven, Hartford, New Britain, Waterbury, Watertown, Bridgeport and Stamford-Norwalk. Most of the photographs are adhered to album paper that identify the place. Some dates are provided. No photographers are identified for almost all of the photographs except for four photographs identified as taken by Frank B. Ramsdell (1876-1954) of Thompson, Connecticut., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The album was acquired in September 2013., Album of 685 photographs of scenes of street railroads and trolley cars in Connecticut.
Diaries Collection
Diaries Collection
The personal diaries of thirteen known individuals, two anonymous diaries, and four travel journals. Individual descriptions of the contents are listed with the collection listing., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Diaries dating from the 19th century provide information on mid-century farm life, social activities, local travel and education at a one room school. Two “thoughts diaries” of the same period give one man's views on Christianity, human nature and slavery. Travel journals from the later part of the century describe trips through European countries; these also contain information on transportation and lodging. Those dating from the 20th century reveal much about the life of a Connecticut female artist and her thoughts and feelings concerning World War II. Also included is the 1943 diary of a University of Connecticut coed (Ann T. Winchester) and the 1902 diary of a Hartford store employee (Phineas Gofriels)., The collection was transferred to Historical Manuscripts and Archives in 1984 from the Special Collections Department, Homer Babbidge Library. The Stanton diaries were added in April 1989. In 1995, Special Collections and Historical Manuscripts and Archives merged to form Archives & Special Collections, located in the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center. Additional diaries are added as they are acquired., Diaries dating from the 19th century provide information on mid-century farm life, social activities, local travel and education at a one room school. Two “thoughts diaries” of the same period give one man's views on Christianity, human nature and slavery. Travel journals from the later part of the century describe trips through European countries; these also contain information on transportation and lodging. Those dating from the 20th century reveal much about the life of a Connecticut female artist and her thoughts and feelings concerning World War II. Also included is the 1943 diary of a University of Connecticut coed and the 1902 diary of a Hartford store employee.
E. Ingraham Company Records
E. Ingraham Company Records
The records of the E. Ingraham Company of Bristol, Connecticut, provide information on one of the premier clack and watch manufacturers of American industry during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. They are special companies during industrial revolution in the United States, and with labor organization efforts in such firms between 1930 and 1950.The records consist of account books, general business records, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, maps and drawings which document the company's history from 1840-1967. They include general accounting and administrative records; records relating to sales, purchasing, production, and labor; subsidiary company records. The general correspondence, which comprises more than half of the records, is particularly voluminous for the years 1916-1947. The records are arranged into seven series.The catalogs in boxes 345 and 346 were digitized in 2012 and are available online., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, In 1980, the records were transferred as a gift to the Historical Manuscripts and Archives Division of the University of Connecticut. The records were reprocessed in 1992. In 1995, Historical Manuscripts and Archives merged with Special Collections to become Archives & Special Collections, now located in the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center at the University of Connecticut. In 1939, the E. Ingraham Company deposited many of its account books, general business records and correspondence with Yale University Library. Additional records were added as accessions at various times through 1972. In 1960, the company converted the deposit to a gift to Yale University Library. Separate accessions of E. Ingraham Company Records were arranged and described in 1952, 1955 and 1972., [Item description, #:#], E. Ingraham Company Records. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., For more than a century, the E. Ingraham Company was a prominent family-operated manufacturer of clocks and watches, with headquarters and plants located in Bristol, Connecticut. Most of its employees were natives of the Bristol region, and members of the Ingraham family of Bristol controlled its management.The company underwent numerous reorganizations and name changes, particularly during the 19th century. It was founded in 1831, when Elias Ingraham (1805-1885) opened his own shop in Bristol as a cabinetmaker and designer of clock cases. In 1841, Benjamin Ray and Andrew Ingraham founded Ray and Ingraham, and hired Elias Ingraham, whose business had succumbed to financial difficulties, as a case maker and designer. This firm was succeeded in 1844 by Brewster and Ingrahams, with Elisha Brewster, a clock movement maker, joining Andrew and Elias Ingraham as partners, succeeded this firm in 1844. In 1852, the company name was changed to E. and A. Ingraham. When fire destroyed their plant in 1855, the Ingrahams relocated temporarily in Ansonia, Connecticut, returning to Bristol in 1857. The company name continued to change: Elias Ingraham and Company (1857-1860), E. Ingraham and Company (1861-1880), and E. Ingraham and Company (1881-1884). From 1884 to 1958, the period during which most of the surviving company records were created, the firm was known as E. Ingraham Company. In 1958, the name was changed to Ingraham Company, and in November 1967, when the company was sold to McGraw Edison Company, it became Ingraham Industries.From the 1850s until his death in 1885, Elias Ingraham served as president of the company. His son, Edward Ingraham (1850-1892), who served until his death in 1892, succeeded him. Walter A. Ingraham (1855-1939), Edward's son, was president from 1892 until 1927, when he became chairman of the board. His brother, William S. Ingraham (1857-1930), served as company treasurer for many years. In 1927, William's son Edward Ingraham II (1887-1972) succeeded his uncle as president of the company, serving until 1954. Edward's brother, Dudley S. Ingraham (b. 1890) was the last of the Ingraham family to hold the position of president, from 1954 until 1956. However, Edward Ingraham continued as chairman of the board from 1954 to 1961. Later presidents of the company included Robert E. Cooper, Jr. (1956-1961), Bret C. Neece, who served concurrently as chairman of the board (1961-1963) and Wesley A. Songer (1963-?).E. Ingraham Company's products throughout its history reflected technological advances and changing consumer demands for timepieces. Until about 1890, the company manufactured only pendulum clocks, such as the spring-driven 8-day pendulum clocks produced by Brewster and Ingrahams. During the 1890s, they began making lever escapement time clocks and alarm clocks. Radical changes in manufacturing methods during the following decade enabled E. Ingraham Company to produce 30-hour alarm clocks, pocket watches (1914), and 8-day alarm lever and timepieces (1915). In 1913 the company purchased the machinery, equipment and inventories of Bannatyne Watch Company of Waterbury. Soon after, they began to manufacture the popular “dollar watch.” In 1930, Ingraham added non-jeweled wrist watches and in 1931 began marketing electric clocks.The depression of the 1930s did not affect E. Ingraham Company as severely as it did many other businesses. Employment never dropped more than 15% and wage and salaries were not cut. By the beginning of the Second World War, the company was producing clocks and watches at maximum capacity in order to meet the great export need after many European supplies were cut off. However, in 1942 the War Production Board ordered E. Ingraham Company to cease manufacture of all clocks and watches. By August 1942 the company had entirely re-tooled for production of items of critical war use, such as mechanical time-fuse parts for Army and Navy anti-aircraft and artillery. Full production of clocks and watches was not resumed until 1946, but the years 1946 to 1948 were boom years for company sales. Meanwhile, E. Ingraham Company employees were unionized in 1941 by the United Electrical Workers (UE). Accused of being the “communistic wing of the labor movement,” the UE was forced out of the CIO. In 1950 the IUE-CIO replaced the UE as the union representing E. Ingraham Company workers. The company was sold to McGraw Edison Company in November 1967 and its name changed to Ingraham Industries., For more than a century, the E. Ingraham Company was a prominent family-operated manufacturer of clocks and watches, with headquarters and plants located in Bristol, Connecticut.
Edwin Way Teale Papers
Edwin Way Teale Papers
Teale's papers include field notes and drafts for each of his books, early childhood writings, professional writings for magazines, newspapers and book reviews, correspondence- both personal and professional, personal and family documents, scrapbooks, and memorabilia, as well as his photographs (prints, negatives, and transparencies) and his personal library. There is also one box of original John Burroughs material Teale collected over the years., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Two large donations were made by the author, Edwin Way Teale, and then by Nellie Teale after her husband's death., [Item description, #:#], Edwin Way Teale Papers. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., Edwin “Way” Teale (christened Edwin Albert Teale) was born on 2 June 1899 in Joliet, Illinois. His father, Oliver Cromwell Teale, was British and had emigrated from England in 1884. After working in New York and then Illinois as a railroad mechanic, he met his future wife, Clara Louise Way at a party hosted by her parents. The future Mrs. Oliver Teale had grown up on “Lone Oak” farm, which Edwin fondly wrote about in his book Dune Boy. Edwin's early years were kept busy with church, school, and more “school” at home, his mother having been a teacher. Although he always felt connected with nature, it was only during the summers, visiting his grandparents at Lone Oak farm, that he was able to roam free. Edwin kept a journal from very early on, documenting the natural world and things he found interesting.In 1918, Edwin Way Teale enlisted in the Student Army Training Corps, but was discharged only two months later. He then transferred to Earlham College, where his uncle, David Edwards, was President. It was at Earlham where he met Nellie Imogene Donovan. She was instrumental in his life as a wife, friend, assistant and editor. Edwin's major in college was English, and he was active in many clubs and sports teams including the Football Team, Oratory Club and Debating Team.After graduating from Earlham in 1922, Edwin took a job as head of the department of public speaking and debate at Friend's University in Wichita, Kansas. Nellie graduated in the spring of 1923 and they were married on 1 August. The Teales stayed for one more year at Friend's, Edwin continued teaching while Nellie became the athletic director.The Teales then journeyed to New York, where Edwin entered Columbia University. While obtaining his Masters degree and working on his thesis paper entitled Jeffries Criticism of Wordsworth and Scott he submitted his editorials to Dr. Crane, a noted editorial writer. During this time the Teales had their only child, David. After graduating, Teale had hopes of getting a job on the editorial staff of Columbia Dispatch, but after several months of waiting for the official offer and a dwindling bank account, Edwin was forced to try his luck in New York. It was here where he began his decade long career at Popular Science. Edwin wrote on average, four articles an issue, some ghost-written, anonymous or written using pen names. In 1942, after having success with freelance articles, and his first few books ( A Book About Gliders, The Golden Throng), he resigned to work full time for himself.The following years were filled with happiness and great sadness. Although Edwin's career as a writer, photographer and public speaker prospered, David joined the army at 18. While on a reconnaissance mission in Germany, David was killed when a bomb sunk the small boat he was on. David and several others drowned. For almost a year, David's status was Missing in Action. After months of inquiries they finally discovered most of what happened and were given the official letter by the government. As Edwin stated, the only thing that kept them from despair was their love of nature.In 1959, Edwin and Nellie decided to move from their home in Baldwin, New York, to a more rural area. After touring the area in a hot-air balloon they decided to purchase a seventy-nine acre property in Hampton, Connecticut they named “Trail Wood”. He documented their quest for the perfect home in his book entitled A Naturalist Buys an Old Farm. Frequently the Teales welcomed visitors: fans, hikers and naturalists wishing a tour, or just to explore the property. Edwin and Nellie were members of such organizations and societies as the Thoreau Society, the Explorer's Club, the John Burroughs Memorial Association and the New York Entomological Society. They were good friends with many other naturalists and kept extensive correspondence, with relatives, friends, fans, and other influential people including Rachel Carson, Roger Tory Peterson, William T. Davis, and Julian Burroughs. His 32 books have been published in many languages, as well as in Braille. He won the Pulitzer prize in 1966, and received the Burroughs Medal in 1943 for his book, Near Horizons, among other awards and honors. His fans continued to send Edwin and Nellie letters even after his death in October 1980. Edwin and Nellie chose to donate their materials to the University of Connecticut Libraries and preserved Trail Wood by donating it to the Connecticut Audubon Society. It is now known as the Edwin Way Teale Memorial Sanctuary and is seasonally open for tours., Edwin Way Teale, Connecticut-based naturalist, was the author of thirty-two books. His papers include field notes and drafts for each of his books, early childhood writings, professional writings for magazines, newspapers and book reviews, correspondence- both personal and professional, personal and family documents, scrapbooks, and memorabilia, as well as his photographs (prints, negatives, and transparencies) and his personal library. There is also one box of original John Burroughs material Teale collected over the years.
Farina Family Film Collection
Farina Family Film Collection
Personal videos of the Farina and Allings families depicting footage of recreational boating, damage to Connecticut towns from the hurricane of 1938, logging activity, and the Louis vs Schmeling boxing match as well as other family activities., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Donated by Katharine Farina December 19th, 2002., Personal videos of the Farina and Allings families depicting footage of recreational boating, damage to Connecticut towns from the hurricane of 1938, logging activity, and the Louis vs Schmeling boxing match as well as other family activities.
Farrel Company Records
Farrel Company Records
The Farrel Company Records document a prominent Connecticut business with contents such as newspaper clippings, information on legislative bills, correspondence, executive and campaign records, grant files, questionnaires and press releases. Also included in this collection is information pertaining to the towns in which the factories were located. Additional records including ledgers, journals and photographs found after box 234 were added at a later date and have not been fully inventoried., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The Farrel Company was founded in 1848 by Almon Farrel in Ansonia, Connecticut. Almon Farrel was a prominent engineer and millwright whose contributions to manufacturing enterprises appeared in Connecticut and southern New York. Aided by his son, Franklin, Almon Farrel won his reputation by successfully constructing and equipping manufacturing plants. In 1844, at the request of Anson Phelps, Almon Farrel and his son journeyed to Ansonia to survey, engineer and build a water project and erect a copper mill. The Farrel presence remains evident in town today. Almon Farrel's original business in Ansonia was Almon Farrel and Company. Begun in 1848, the business included a small foundry and machine shop. The company supplied heavy machinery to manufacturers in the Naugatuck valley. Earlier products were power drives and gears for water-powered installations and brass and iron castings. Late in 1848, Almon and Franklin Farrel entered in a partnership with Richard Johnson, a pattern maker, and formed Farrel-Johnson Company. Almon Farrel contributed $8,000 of the $15,000 capital required to begin operations. In 1850, the partnership was incorporated and renamed Farrel Foundry with Almon Farrel serving as president. In 1851, the company expanded its operations to Waterbury, Connecticut, where a foundry and machine ship were built. The Waterbury facilities were designed to offset transportation difficulties and speed repair service in that area. In 1880 the plant was taken over by its manager, Edward Coffin Lewis. In return for his quarter interest in the Farrel business, Lewis received control of the Waterbury branch, severing all legal ties with the parent company. Lewis served as president of Waterbury Farrel Foundry & Machine Company until his death in 1901. The company remains in operation today as a division of Jones & Lamson Textron. Following Almon Farrel's death in 1857, Farrel Foundry reorganized and was incorporated as Farrel Foundry & Machine Company. It was capitalized with $90,000,000. In 1869 Franklin Farrel became president of the Company. Farrel Foundry & Machine Company products were designed to meet the needs of the expanding brass and rubber industries in the area. The company concentrated on producing rolling mills and rubber processing machinery and fabricated the first rubber calendars used in industry. Production of chilled iron rolls remained a mainstay of the company's business until the mid twentieth century. The company proceeded to produce roll-equipped machinery for the plastics, metals, paper and sugar industries. A policy of diversification was implemented in the 1870s when Farrel Foundry & Machine Company began manufacturing sugar mills. In a separate venture, Franklin Farrel purchased sugar estates in Cuba and Santa Domingo. Interests in these ventures were sold in 1903. In 1877 Franklin Farrel acquired the Parrott Silver & Copper Company in Butte, Montana. After limited success in this and other mining ventures, Farrel sold Parrott to Amalgamated Copper Company in 1889. In 1920, the company purchased a plant in Buffalo, New York, to help meet the growing demand for rubber machinery. However, the plant was never used for its original purpose. Farrel acquired a patent for the Sykes Gear Cutting Machine and the Buffalo facilities were utilized for gear production. The plant closed in 1961. In 1927, Farrel Foundry and Machine Company merged with the Birmingham Iron Foundry to form Farrel-Birmingham Company, Inc. Founded in 1836 by Sylvester and Sullivan Colburn, Birmingham Iron Foundry produced primarily rubber machinery. [ Farrel Company currently uses 1836 as its founding date.] Farrel-Birmingham Company, Inc. acquired Consolidated Machine Tool Corporation located in Rochester, New York, in 1951. This corporation represented a conglomeration of machine tool companies with the facilities and equipment capable of handling Farrel's larger operations. The plant and product lines were sold to Conlin Company in 1983. The company shortened its name to the Farrel Corporation in 1963. In 1968 the company joined United States Shoe Machinery (USM) with divisional status. In 1976, Emhart Corporation merged with USM and the Farrel Machinery Group, as it was then known, became a division of Emhart. On 6 May 1981, Franklin Farrel IV resigned as assistant secretary of the company, signaling the end of family participation in the business. The company's most recent name, Farrel Company, Emhart Machinery Group, dates from 1983. in 1989 Emhart was taken over by Black & Decker. In the 1980s the Farrel Company operated three plants in Ansonia and Derby, had subsidiaries and licensees in over thirty countries and produced the heavy machinery that built the company's reputation over 100 years ago., The Farrel Company papers were donated to the University of Connecticut Libraries in April 1982, by Franklin Farrel III. The materials in accession 2012-0130 were donated by the Farrel family and brought to the Archives & Special Collections in August 2012 by UConn Professor Fred Carstensen., The Farrel Company was founded in 1848 in Ansonia, Connecticut by Almon Farrel and his son Franklin, and made brass and iron castings, wooden mortise gears and parts for water-power plants. By the 1860s the company was producing rollng mill equipment for the rapidly expanding copper and brass industries, and pioneered in the development of processing machinery for the rubber industry. Other items produced included stone and ore crushers, iron rolls (used for milling) and processing equipment for rubber, plastics, linoleum, and paper. Throughout many name changes and mergers the company remained a family owned business until the 1980s.
Fred Otto Makowsky Papers
Fred Otto Makowsky Papers
The Fred Otto Makowsky Papers consist of photographs taken by Makowsky and papers collected by him. The photographs consist of over 4000 images of New Haven Railroad and other American steam and electric locomotives, multiple unit cars, and trolleys, and scenes of Stamford, Connecticut. Most of the images were removed from the original albums, given unique identifying numbers, and sleeved in Mylar enclosures. The photographs of Stamford, Connecticut, remain in their original album compiled by Makowsky. The papers consist of train tickets, newspaper clippings, correspondence to Makowsky, and other railroad-related printed materials. In addition, two models of New York & New Haven Railroad coaches, built by Makowsky in 1936, are on permanent display in the Reference Room, Thomas J. Dodd Research Center., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The collection was donated by Roy Makowsky, nephew of Fred Otto Makowsky, of Westport, Connecticut. Prior to Roy Makowsky's ownership of the papers and photographs they belonged to his aunt Mary Makowsky and then his mother., [Item, Folder # or photographic identifier number], Fred Otto Makowsky Papers. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., Fred Otto Makowsky was born in New York City on 26 July 1888. His father, Otto Maximilian Makowsky, immigrated from Germany. When Fred was at an early age, his family moved to Stamford, Connecticut, where his father opened a successful barbershop on Relay Place. Young Fred demonstrated a keen interest and an exceptional skill in crafting things at an early age. At age 13 he built his first model train, a sleeper passenger coach. It was built of cardboard, well- lacquered and painted and had wheels of thread spools. When 14 he build a working paddle wheel boat by modifying a small rowboat. Although he had several varying interests at that time, such as collecting butterflies, Indian arrowheads, and stamps and coins, his real love was railroads. He wanted to work in railroading, but his father discouraged such a "new-fangled" pursuit and directed him to engage in work of "more substance", such as bookkeeping. And so he obtained a job as bookkeeper, accountant working for the coal firm of Graves & Strang. He also had a job more to his liking -- engraving tombstones for Bounty's Monuments -- and did so well that he won a design contest for a Stamford City Monument. Throughout his life, Fred Makowsky continued to be lured by railroads. On weekends he traveled throughout the country to view various cars or railroad stations, which he photographed. Over the years, he acquired an extensive collection of railroad timetables, train tickets, posters, photographs and other railroad memorabilia. He spent countless hours crafting metal railroad cars, paying attention to minute details in an effort to recreate them as perfectly as possible. All of these cars ran in his attic under electric power. He also crafted the tracks, along with realistic scenery, tunnels, turntables and other models. Fred made it a point to attend the Chicago World's Fair to view the Railroad Exhibition, as well as the 1939 New York World's Fair. In 1937 he was offered a job designing and making scenery for backgrounds for exhibits for the New York Fair. However, he turned down the job offer, saying that if his hobby became his work it would cease to be fun. Fred led a very modest life as a bachelor, living in Springdale, Connecticut, with his sister, who also never married. However, his spare time was filled with the vicarious excitement of a new and fascinating means of travel. Although he never could pursue the career he so longed for, one can't help but think that at least he could imagine what life would have been like as a railroad engineer as he crafted his trains, or browsed through his collections. He died on 23 December 1952, leaving a wealth of railroad memorabilia that would live long after him for others to enjoy as he did. Written by Roy Makowsky, donor of the Fred Otto Makowsky Papers., The Fred Otto Makowsky Papers consist of photographs taken by Makowsky and papers collected by him. The photographs consist of over 4000 images of New Haven Railroad and other American steam and electric locomotives, multiple unit cars, and trolleys, and scenes of Stamford, Connecticut.
George W. Hanford Papers
George W. Hanford Papers
The collection contains correspondence, notes and postcards., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, George W. Hanford of Kensington, CT, was a soldier in the medical corps of the 306th Field Artillery during World War I., The collection was purchased in November 1996., Correspondence, notes and postcards of Pfc. George W. Hanford of Kensington, Connecticut, a soldier in the medical corps of the 306th Field Artillery during World War I.
Guides to Connecticut History Collections
Guides to Connecticut History Collections
Guides to collections relating to Connecticut history in the UConn Archives and Special Collections, Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries
Hampton Antiquarian and Historical Society Collection
Hampton Antiquarian and Historical Society Collection
This broad collection dates from the early nineteenth to the early twentieth century. Featuring Administrative records, awards, books, clippings, correspondence, ephemera, financial records, interviews, legal documents, manuscripts, military records, oral histories, photographs, postcards, posters, publications, realia, and scrapbooks, the collection offers a wide range of sources relevant to the history of Hampton., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, With the exception of the records of the Hampton Antiquarian & Historical Society (Series IV), the materials in the collection were donated over time to the HA&HS located in Hampton, CT as part of the organization's ongoing mission to document the history of Hampton and its environs., [Item description, #:#], Hampton Antiquarian and Historical Society Collection, Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., Founded in 1968, the Hampton Antiquarian and Historical Society is located at the Burnham-Hibbard House. In 1984, the Dodd Center received the Hampton Antiquarian and Historical Society's collections on deposit., This collection contains the archive of the Hampton Antiquarian and Historical Society. Built on a diverse collection of documents, photographs and artifacts, the collection showcases the history of Hampton from the nineteenth century through early twentieth century.
Hartford Electric Light Company Records
Hartford Electric Light Company Records
The records consist of writings about the history of the Hartford Electric Light Company, correspondence, newspaper and magazine clippings, reports, notes, maps, photographs, contracts, publications and financial records., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The Hartford Electric Light Company received its charter from the Connecticut General Assembly in 1881 and began service in 1882 to provide electricity for the city of Hartford, Connecticut. The company's board of directors elected Austin Cornelius Dunham as president. The company's first initiative, in 1883, was to install arc lighting to the Asylum Street railroad station; by 1900 Hartford was the first city in New England with an all-electric streetlighting system. The company, better known as HELCO, was soon known as an innovator in the generation and distribution of electricity and was the first to make practical applications of several important new developments that were destined eventually to become the industry's standard practices. HELCO was the first public utility in the United States to transmit three-phase alternating current at high voltage for any considerable distance. In 1893 the company transmitted three-phase alternating current at between 4000 and 5000 volts from the Rainbow Hydroelectric Station in Windsor, Connecticut, on the Farmington River, to its Pearl Street station in Hartford, where its steam power plant was located at that time. In 1896 the company was the first to use a storage battery in connection with a hydraulic plant, making it possible to supply the peak load requirements from water power that would otherwise have gone to waste during periods of relatively small demand. The company was the first public utility in the United States to use steam turbines to drive its generators. The first turbine, nicknamed "Mary Ann" and weighing 91,700 pounds, was installed in the company's 266 Pearl Street generating station in Hartford in April 1901. It was a Westinghouse - Parsons type turbine manufactured by the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with a turbo-generator capacity at 1500 kilowatts. Considered obsolete by 1908 it was relocated to the company's Dutch Point location. By 1908 President Dunham invented an electric range complete with broiler, cooker, and roaster. The company marketed the range for the use of its customer and soon 20,000 ranges were installed in homes in the Hartford area. Dunham also received patents for his inventions of a radiator with an electrical unit, a device to heat water, and an ice-making machine and by the mid-1910s these electrical appliances were commonplace in Hartford households. HELCO built a dam and powerhouse at Tariffville, Connecticut, in the town of Simsbury, on the Farmington River, in 1899. It had two pairs of 1300 horsepower water wheels connected to two 750 kilowatt Westinghouse generators. The company again scored a first when they used aluminum for the conductors in the transmission line. The Tariffville dam and powerhouse were destroyed in the Flood of 1955. In 1915 HELCO and the Connecticut Power Company, which served New London, Middletown and northwestern Connecticut with generating stations at Falls Village (a hydro-electric station on the Housatonic River) and Canaan, entered into a power exchange agreement where they would work cooperatively to supply power to each others' customers. Samuel Ferguson, who served as president and/or chairman of HELCO from 1924 to 1946, arranged to acquire common stock in the Connecticut Power Company and the companies consolidated their engineering, purchasing and construction operations. A power station was built in 1921 at South Meadows in Hartford, which became the site of another first when, in 1928, the company installed one of the first commercial mercury cycle generating units in the world (this was soon discontinued due to improvements in conventional steam turbines). In 1900 HELCO had 3200 customers. By 1950 that number was up to 89,000, in a 245 square mile area of Greater Hartford. In 1958 HELCO merged with the Connecticut Power Company, and in 1982 the company formally merged into Connecticut Light & Power., The collection was donated by the Connecticut Historical Society in 1996 with a small addition in 2005., Electric company of Hartford, Connecticut, established in 1882. Records consist of writings about the history of the company, correspondence, contracts, notes, maps, photographs, publications and financial records.
Hartford National Corporation Records
Hartford National Corporation Records
Much of the material in this collection complements and fills in gaps in the records of the Hartford National Bank and Trust Company (HNB&T) also located in Archives & Special Collections. Records dating from 1792-1976 should be used in conjunction with its materials and finding aid. Records dating from 1977-1995 document the bank's consolidation with the Hartford National Corporation and its subsequent merger with the Shawmut National Corporation in 1988. The Hartford National Corporation (HNC) collection also documents its merger with the Connecticut National Bank (CNB) in 1982. As a result of this merger, the HNC collection possesses over 80 linear feet of records produced by that organization.Because of the important roles played by the HNC and the CNB in Connecticut's banking history, the records of both banks have been classified as separate series even though the CNB was one of the HNC's many merger banks. All records produced by other banks that eventually merged with either the HNC or the CNB constitute the third series of this collection. Series I and II are divided chronologically into five subseries that represent the numerous titles assumed by each bank since its establishment. Series III consists of two alphabetically arranged series that list banks absorbed by the HNC and the CNB, as well as several unidentified records and items., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The records of the Hartford National Corporation were donated along with the Hartford National Bank and Trust Company Records to Archives & Special Collections by the Shawmut Corporation in November 1995 at the time of its merger with Fleet Bank (now Bank of America). Later in May 1996, Archives & Special Collections received a smaller shipment of records from Fleet Bank that were integrated with those received during the previous year., [item description, #:#], Hartford National Corporation Records. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., Hartford National Corporation(1792-1988)In 1969, the Hartford National Bank and Trust Company became the first completely owned subsidiary bank of the newly established Hartford National Corporation ( HNC). After this merger, the HNC could boast assets totaling over $1.1 billion. Soon, the HNC expressed interest in purchasing the Connecticut National Bank ( CNB), a merger that would almost double the number of banks under its management and increase its assets from $2.8 billion to over $4 billion. In December 1981, shareholders from each bank voted in favor of the merger and in 1982 the merger took place. Now among the largest banking interests in southern New England, the HNC began looking for markets north of Connecticut. Changing interstate regulation laws allowed for a merger with Shawmut National Corporation, a Boston-based “Super-Regional” banking conglomerate, in 1988. Now amongst the largest twenty five banking concerns in the nation, the Shawmut National Corporation enjoyed assets totaling over $26 billion. Hartford, CT remained one of the two dual headquarters for the corporation until its eventual merger with Fleet Bank (now Bank of America) in 1995.Note: For a detailed history of the Hartford National Corporation from 1792-1976, see the history provided in the introduction of the Hartford National Bank and Trust Company finding aid. Connecticut National Bank. The Bridgeport Bank was founded by a small group of prominent Connecticut men on 20 November 1806. The citizens of the young borough of Bridgeport recognized that in order to facilitate their growing trade with the West Indies and Europe, they needed the stability of currency and financial assistance that could only be provided by a local bank. On 3 February 1807, the Board of Directors selected Isaac Bronson to fill the office of bank president. This wealthy and influential citizen lent his reputation to the bank and insured its survival when the British blockade all but suspended trade along the Atlantic seaboard during the War of 1812.The Bridgeport Bank helped guide the borough, which became a city in 1836, from its early days as a center of trade through its emergence as a manufacturing center in the ante-bellum years. This period of the bank's history was marked by several financial panics resulting from over speculation. Yet when as a result of these recessions numerous Connecticut banks were forced to liquidate, the prudence and experience possessed by presidents such as Sylvanious Sterling (1837-1848) and Sherman Hartwell (1849-1869) insured the Bridgeport Bank joined the recently created National Banking System and became the Bridgeport National Bank. A dramatic rise in manufacturing occurred in the Bridgeport area after the Civil War. During the twenty years between 1886-1906, the bank's deposits mushroomed from $60,000 to just over $1,000,000. This remarkable success fueled a series of mergers between the Bridgeport National Bank and its local rivals. In 1909, the bank merged with the First National Bank to become the First Bridgeport National Bank. Twelve years later after a merger with the Connecticut National Bank, the bank changed its name to the First National Bank of Bridgeport. Afterward the bank developed trust and personal savings account services and in 1929 changed its name to the First National Bank and Trust Company of Bridgeport. In 1933, the First National Bank and Trust Company of Bridgeport opened a branch office in Newfield after its merger with the Newfield Bank and Trust Company. No other Connecticut bank had opened a branch office since 1865, but soon most banks were following the First National Bank's initiative. More and more bank patrons were moving from city centers to reside in their surrounding suburbs. Banks could no longer rely solely on one downtown office to conduct business. The First National Bank and Trust Company changed its name to the Connecticut National Bank in 1955 shortly after its merger with the Westport First National Bank. In that year, the Connecticut National Bank could boast deposits of over $100 million. Shortly before its controversial merger with the Hartford National Corporation, the Connecticut National Bank was worth over $700 million, making it one of the largest banking operations in the state. After its merger with the HNC in 1982, the name of the Connecticut National Bank replaced that of the Hartford National Bank and Trust Company in every one of the 115 branches owned by the HNC. This situation changed when the HNC was purchased by the Boston-based Shawmut National Corporation in 1988., In 1969, the Hartford National Bank and Trust Company became the first completely owned subsidiary bank of the newly established Hartford National Corporation. After this merger, the HNC had assets totaled over $1.1 billion. The purchase of Connecticut National Bank would almost double the number of banks under its management and increase its assets drastically. The HNC merged with Shawmut National Corporation. Hartford remained one of the two dual headquarters for the corporation until its eventual merger with Fleet Bank in 1995.
J. B. Williams Company Records
J. B. Williams Company Records
The records of the J.B. Williams Company provide information on a company known for its manufacture of fine men's toiletries. The records also provide some bibliographical information on the company's founder, James Baker Williams (1818-1907), and his family. The bulk of the records are from the period 1850 to 1930 when the company was still a family owned and operated enterprise. Records pertaining to the post-1930 period, during which the company expanded and was eventually sold, are limited. The majority of the records are bound volumes which record the general business of the company such as accounting records, purchasing records, sales records, and overseas sales records. A small amount of administrative records give a more intimate view of the company's history. In addition, the records contain scrapbooks and advertisements which give an excellent example of the types of promotional campaigns popular in the United States at that time. Many of these advertisements contain drawings or photographs from the 1930s and 1940s of important athletes from a variety of sports including baseball, football, boxing, and track and field. There is, however, only a small amount of personal and biographical information and correspondence concerning James B. Williams and his family., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The J.B. Williams Company Records were donated to the University of Connecticut in May 1967. The J.B. Williams Company donated the records to the Historical Society of Glastonbury when the company closed its Connecticut facilities in 1960. The Historical Society of Glastonbury donated the records to the University of Connecticut in May 1967., [Item description, #:#], J.B. Williams Company Records. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., James Baker Williams was born in 1818 in Lebanon, Connecticut. He was educated in Manchester, Connecticut, and, in 1834, began employment with F. and H.C. Woodbridge, a general store located in Manchester. Williams was offered half-interest in the store in 1838, after which its name was changed to Keeny and Williams. Two years later, Williams sold his interest in the store, but retained his share in the drug department. He began experimenting with various soaps to determine which were best for shaving, and eventually developed Williams' Genuine Yankee Soap, the first manufactured soap for use in shaving mugs. In 1847, Williams moved his enterprise to a rented gristmill on William Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut, where he continued to manufacture shaving soap and a few other products. His brother, William S. Williams, joined the firm around 1848, and it was at this time that the firm's name was changed to the James B. Williams and Company. William’s shaving soaps were sold throughout the United States and Canada, and as a result of rising demand, the facilities were expanded several times in the late 1800s. In 1885, a joint stock company under the name of J. B. Williams Company was formed under the laws of the state of Connecticut. James Williams supervised many aspects of the company until shortly before his death in 1907 at the age of eighty-eight. The Williams family continued to manage the company until it was sold in 1957.By the early 1900s, the company was known throughout the world. In addition to its line of shaving creams, the firm produced talcum powder, toilet soaps, and other toilet preparations, eventually developing such as Aqua Velva, Lectric Shave, and Skol. In 1950, the company merged with Conti Products Corporation of Brooklyn, New York, and took over its entire line of products, including Conti Castile Soap. A 1952 merger with R.B. Selmer, Inc. added Kreml Hair Tonic and Kreml Shampoo to the company's list of products. In 1957, a New York based conglomerate, Pharmaceuticals, Inc., acquired the J.B. Williams Company. The new owner, maker of Geritol, Serutan and Sominex, moved the Williams Company to Cranford, New Jersey in 1960, adopting the name J.B. Williams Company. The J.B. Williams' plant in Connecticut was taken over by ten former Williams' employees who wanted to preserve the old soap-making process, and became Glastonbury Toiletries. The firm made shaving soaps, bathroom soaps, castile soap, aerosol shaving creams, body lotions, and shampoos. Its largest contract was with the J.B. Williams Company. In 1971, the J.B. Williams Company was sold to Nabisco, and in 1977, Glastonbury Toiletries closed. The original 1847 factory is still standing, and, in 1979, was converted into a condominium complex. I In 1983 it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places., In 1969, the Hartford National Bank and Trust Company became the first completely owned subsidiary bank of the newly established Hartford National Corporation. After this merger, the HNC had assets totaled over $1.1 billion. The purchase of Connecticut National Bank would almost double the number of banks under its management and increase its assets drastically. The HNC merged with Shawmut National Corporation. Hartford remained one of the two dual headquarters for the corporation until its eventual merger with Fleet Bank in 1995.
J. W. Swanberg Papers
J. W. Swanberg Papers
Collection consists of photographs taken by railroad historian, author and employee J. W. Swanberg of railroad locomotives and other railroad scenes in the United States and Canada., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The J.W. Swanberg Papers consist of chapter and caption drafts, galley proofs, correspondence, and other materials associated with Mr. Swanberg's book New Haven Power and photographs taken by Mr. Swanberg throughout his railroad career.
James T. Smith Papers
James T. Smith Papers
The emphasis of the collection is documentation of the responsibilities Smith carried out during his military career, 1862-1870. Correspondence, reports, inventories and rosters comprise the majority of the collection. There is nothing in the collection regarding Mr. Smith's newspaper career or his activities in Colorado., The collection documents the career of James T. Smith of Connecticut and Colorado, including his service in the U. S. Army., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, James T. Smith was born in Rosscommon, Ireland, on 4 May 1846. As a young boy, he and his parents emigrated to American and settled in Hartford, Connecticut. A member of the 1st Regiment of Volunteers, he acted as Drill Master and Color Sargent at the outbreak of the Civil War. Before the War's end he had been promoted to Captain and served with the 1st Louisiana Volunteers, the 18th U. S. Infantry and the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Properties until his discharge in Mary 1870. Immediately following the end of his army career, Smith traveled west to Colorado. A talented journalist, Smith was the associate editor of the Golden Transcript at the recommendation of William N. Byers. Byers founded the Rocky Mountain News. Serving on the Golden City Council, Smith was instrumental in establishing the City's first fire department in 1872. As mining flourished, he also recognized the need for the establishment of a technical educational institution dedicated to that industry. A result of this realization was the founding of the Colorado School of Mines, on whose Board Smith served from 1876 until 1921. Smith moved from Golden to Denver in 1877, becoming the associate editor of the Rocky Mountain News and in 1878 was promoted to managing editor. Smith remained in this position, with the exception of two years as the City Auditor (1891-1893) and a brief stint as city editor of the Denver Times, for the next fifty years. During his tenure as auditor, Smith was active in the transfer of City Park from the State of Colorado to the city, the organization of the first paid fire department in Denver and financial activities that led to the city's recognition as the "Model American City Government." In 1876, Smith was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for Secretary of State., The collection was donated in December 2014.
James W. Wall Photograph Collection
James W. Wall Photograph Collection
The collection consists of 914 black and white photographic prints of railroad locomotives and trains and street railroads, most of them in the Boston, Massachusetts, area, as well as images of airplanes, automobiles, and ships, from unknown locations, all dated from 1934 to 1941 and then from 1945 to the early 1950s and then again in the 1970s and 1980s. The trains and engines photographed are predominantly those of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, the Boston & Maine Railroad, and the Boston & Albany Railroad, with a few from other railroad lines, most of those in New England but several in other locations in the United States. The collection also includes photographs of men in the United States Army during World War II in locations in Europe (particularly France and England), and after the war in Japan. It is likely that James W. Wall was the photographer for the images but that cannot be confirmed by the images themselves. The only information available on each photograph is the date -- year, month, and day -- it was taken. Location information is not available. The railroad photographs have been sorted into order by railroads but that was done only when the railroad could be distinguished from the image itself. One particular man's image is scattered throughout all the photographs and it is presumed that he is Mr. Wall. With the assistance of Mr. J.W. Swanberg several of the photographs, particularly those of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, have been identified as to location, type of locomotive, and other pertinent circumstances., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The collection was donated by Paul Dickson of Garrett Park, Maryland, in 1993., [Item description, #:#], James W. Wall Photograph Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., Little is known about James W. Wall other than he served in the United States Army during and after World War II, stationed throughout Europe, including London, England, Normandy, Paris, and Reims, France. He was briefly stationed in Japan following the war. Evidence from the postcards in the collection show that he lived in Arlington, Virginia, in the 1970s and 1980s and was at that time a retired Major., Photographs of locomotives and scenes of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, the Boston & Albany Railroad and the Boston & Maine Railroad, and of street railroads in the Boston, Massachusetts, area, most taken in the 1930s and 1940s, most likely by James W. Wall. The collection also includes photographs of scenes that show men in the United States Army in World War II in Europe and after the war in Japan.
Leavenworth Family Papers
Leavenworth Family Papers
The collection contains financial and legal documents, correspondence, publications, maps, photographs, postcards, diplomas, certificates, journals, diaries, manuscripts, notes, clippings and similar materials retained by members of the extended Leavenworth family dating from the 1750s through 1993. As can be expected, the documentation is less plentiful for the earlier generations and becomes increasingly voluminous and diverse for the more recent generations. Of particular interest are the personal diaries and journals of several individuals that record their daily activities and thoughts, extensive correspondence between family members, correspondence during World War I, documentation of travels across the United States, personal ephemera and artifacts., The collection documents the personal and professional lives of several generations of Leavenworths residing in Connecticut., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Elias W. Leavenworth in his A Genealogy of the Leavenworth Family in the United States with Historical Introduction (Dodd C6163) has Thomas Leavenworth arriving in New Haven, Connecticut some time between 1664 and 1675. At time in the 17th century, however, a Thomas Leavenworth, ancestor of this branch of the Leavenworths, settled in western Connecticut and acquired and/or inherited considerable property prior to his death in 1683. The first Leavenworth for which there is documentation in the Leavenworth Family Papers is David Leavenworth. Born in Woodbury, Connecticut, David was a Captain of the Fourth Company, 13th Regiment of the Colony of Connecticut during the American Revolution. Active in the war, documentation of his activities has been recorded in Cothren's Ancient History. Married twice and the father of eight, David died in Woodbury at the age of 82. Morse Leavenworth, the second of David's children, was born in Roxbury, Connecticut on 1 July 1764. A farmer and soldier in the American Revolution (Cothren, p.783), Morse married Sarah Benedict, the daughter of Jonathan Benedict of New Milford, Connecticut in 1783. They had six children, born and raised in the house built by Morse in Roxbury. Morse Leavenworth (Jr.) was born 27 July 1805, the youngest of six children. A farmer, Morse married Amarilla Beecher, the daughter of Deacon John Beecher of New Milford, Connecticut, and fathered three sons. He died in 1852 and Amarilla remarried O. B. Seward. John Henry Leavenworth was born 13 August 1830, the eldest of the three sons of Morse and Amarilla Leavenworth. A farmer and teacher in Roxbury, he married Mary Ann Peck, the daughter of Marquis D. Peck of Morris, Connecticut. They had two children, George and Florence. George Washington Peck Leavenworth was born 12 April 1855 in Roxbury. In the 1880 Census George listed his profession as teacher. He married Cora Turley of Vicksburg, Mississippi prior to 1888. Their only son, Dana Turley Leavenworth, was only a year old when Cora died in 1889. George then married, Nellie Ames, the eldest daughter of James B. Ames of Bethlehem, Connecticut. Married in 1892, Nellie and George had one son, Carleton. Nellie died in 1932 and George moved off the family homestead in Roxbury to Southbury, Connecticut before finally moving to Hartford, Connecticut prior to his death in 1941. Dana T. Leavenworth was born 25 June 1888, presumably in Roxbury. He attended Yale College and graduated in 1910. He joined the Army in 1914 and saw action along the U.S.- Mexico border prior to joining the American Expeditionary Force in France in 1918. Dana returned to the States in 1919 and took up civilian life. He married Marie Christina Schmitz, daughter of Charles W. Schmitz of Waterbury in 1924. Employed as an estate councilor at Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, Dana and Marie established their household at 25 Staples Place in West Hartford, Connecticut. There they raised three sons, Robert, Donald and Alden. Marie died in 1950 and Dana married Katherine Marsh in 1954. Dana's autobiography, The Passing Scene, was published in 1973. Dana died in December 1980. Two of his children attended Yale University, recipients (like their father) of the Leavenworth Family Scholarship at that institution, and all married and settled out of state. Carleton Ames Leavenworth was born 26 September 1893, also presumably in Roxbury. He also attended Yale College and graduated in 1919. Carleton lived in New York City for some time, before returning to Connecticut and marrying Katherine Stone, daughter of Harvey R. Stone, in 1935 and settled in Southbury, Connecticut. While it is difficult to determine precisely, it appears that Carleton owned a book shop for several years before turning to more literary pursuits. He published several collections of poetry and prose and edited a literary magazine in 1957. Carleton died in 1958. Detailed genealogical information on the members of the Leavenworth family from their arrival in the United States in the seventeenth century through the mid nineteenth century can be found in A Genealogy of the Leavenworth Family in the United States with Historical Introduction by Elias Warner Leavenworth [Dodd Call ]. Information about the Roxbury/Woodbury area can be found in several town histories, also available in Archives & Special Collections., The collection was donated to Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center by Robert, Donald and Alden Leavenworth in August 2003.

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