Literary & Artistic Expression

About This Collection

Charles Olson Research Collection
The Charles Olson Research Collection features a wide range of materials covering such diverse topics as the Life and Works of Herman Melville, Black Mountain College, the Beat Generation, the Office of Wartime Information, and the Literary and Cultural Revolution of the 1960's. Correspondents of note include T.S. Eliot, Allen Ginsberg, LeRoi Jones, and Ezra Pound. The collection includes Olson's prose and poetry, correspondence with more than 1500 individuals, documents and ephemera from Olson's personal life, family papers, photographs, newspapers, atlases, books, journals and records from Black Mountain College. The bulk of the collection dates from Olson's lifetime, 1910-1970. However, as the Archives and Special Collections continued collecting donations from friends, acquaintances and family members after Olson's death, some items in the collection date from after Olson's death., The Charles Olson Research Collection is comprised of the personal papers, literary manuscripts, and library of the American poet Charles Olson. The Collection includes a range of materials covering such diverse topics as the life and works of Herman Melville, Black Mountain College, history of Gloucester, Massachusetts, and the literary and cultural revolution of the 1960’s. Since their acquisition in 1972, the original papers have been augmented by numerous additions through purchase and by gift., Charles Olson was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on 27 December 1910, to Karl Joseph and Mary Hines Olson. He attended Wesleyan University where he received a B.A. in 1932 and a M.A. in 1933. He continued his graduate studies at Harvard University from 1936 to 1938. His daughter Katherine was born during his first marriage, to Constance Wilcock. His second marriage, to Elizabeth Kaiser, produced a son, Charles Peter. Elizabeth, or Betty as she was known to her friends, died tragically in a car accident in March 1964. Charles Olson received several prestigious awards during his long career, including two Guggenheim Fellowships, in 1939 and 1948; a Wenner-Gren Foundation grant in 1952; a Longview Foundation award for The Maximus Poems in 1961; and an Oscar Blumenthal Prize (Poetry magazine), 1965. Charles Olson died from cancer on 10 January 1970.
Charles Olson’s Melville Project
Charles Olson began a study of the life and works of Herman Melville in the 19302 while a graduate student at Wesleyan University. Olson’s Master’s thesis, The Growth of Herman Melville, Prose Writer and Poetic Thinker, was completed in 1933, but his work on Melville continued. Olson was one of the first scholars to consider the importance of Melville’s reading and marginalia. In the 1930s, Melville’s surviving literary manuscripts, letters, personal papers and journals, and reading library were still, for the most part, in the possession of the family and a few institutional or private collectors. The most substantial collection of Melville materials unaccounted for at that point were the “lost five hundred,” the approximate number of books Melville’s widow had sold to a Brooklyn dealer in 1892. Olson carefully transcribed onto note cards bibliographic information on the volume, as well as the content and location of Melville’s annotations and marks.
Children's Books: Their Creators and Collectors
Video of interviews with children’s book authors, illustrators and collectors conducted by Billie Levy. Originally broadcast on West Hartford cable television as episodes of “Children’s Books: Their Creators and Collectors.” Video of interviews with children’s book authors, illustrators and collectors conducted by Billie Levy. Originally broadcast on West Hartford cable television as episodes of “Children’s Books: Their Creators and Collectors.”, Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Video of interviews with children’s book authors, illustrators and collectors conducted by Billie Levy. Originally broadcast on West Hartford cable television as episodes of “Children’s Books: Their Creators and Collectors.”, Levy, a retired children’s librarian, has been rescuing orphaned children’s books from used bookstores and garage sales for more than two decades. Generations of American schoolchildren have grown up reading some of the classics on her shelves, such as the adventures of the lovable pachyderm, The Travels of Babar (1934); the trials of The Five Chinese Brothers (1938); the plucky confidence of Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel (1939); the madcap antics adapted from a folktale, Caps for Sale (1940); the high-spirited heroine, Madeline (1940); and the footloose freedom paraded in the story Make Way for Ducklings (1941). Another perennial favorite she collected is Millions of Cats (1928): “It’s the perfect children’s book. The text was hand-lettered. It set the standards for illustrated books — wonderful pictures [of cats] flowed over the pages. Pictures have to be totally integrated to work at all,” she says. Since about 1997, she has been making her laudable labors of collecting permanently available to others by transferring the astounding 8,000 volumes of children’s fiction, fairy tales and folklore she has collected to the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center at the University of Connecticut. Levy’s donation, along with the donations from other collectors, helped to establish the Northeast Children’s Literature Collection at the university, one of only several similar research collections in the country. “I had a basement full of books. My husband, a law professor at UConn, kept building me shelves,” she said. Eventually, her books were overtaking space, and the idea of a children’s collection at UConn was a perfect solution. “Norman Stevens was the UConn librarian at the time; he put them on loan. When I saw the appreciation [that people had for the collection], I gave them to the university.”, This project was made possible by the generosity of Susan Aller of West Hartford, in honor of Billie M. Levy. Ms. Aller is the author of more than a dozen biographies for young people, including the stories of J. M. Barrie, Florence Nightingale, George Eastman, Louisa May Alcott, and Mary Jemison. She has worked as a magazine editor in New York City, and her essays on a variety of topics have appeared in The New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, and other publications. Ms. Aller is a graduate of the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and lived for extended periods in Spain and France, before coming to Connecticut in 1979. As a collector of antique children’s books, she has been an active supporter of the Northeast Children’s Literature Collection at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center at the University of Connecticut in Storrs. She participates weekly in a long-standing writers’ group and is a member of the Saturday Morning Club of Hartford, a women’s writing group founded in 1876. Ms. Aller is the mother of two married sons and has six grandchildren.
Edwin Way Teale Papers
Teale's papers include field notes and drafts for each of his books, early childhood writings, professional writings for magazines, newspapers and book reviews, correspondence- both personal and professional, personal and family documents, scrapbooks, and memorabilia, as well as his photographs (prints, negatives, and transparencies) and his personal library. There is also one box of original John Burroughs material Teale collected over the years., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Two large donations were made by the author, Edwin Way Teale, and then by Nellie Teale after her husband's death., [Item description, #:#], Edwin Way Teale Papers. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., Edwin “Way” Teale (christened Edwin Albert Teale) was born on 2 June 1899 in Joliet, Illinois. His father, Oliver Cromwell Teale, was British and had emigrated from England in 1884. After working in New York and then Illinois as a railroad mechanic, he met his future wife, Clara Louise Way at a party hosted by her parents. The future Mrs. Oliver Teale had grown up on “Lone Oak” farm, which Edwin fondly wrote about in his book Dune Boy. Edwin's early years were kept busy with church, school, and more “school” at home, his mother having been a teacher. Although he always felt connected with nature, it was only during the summers, visiting his grandparents at Lone Oak farm, that he was able to roam free. Edwin kept a journal from very early on, documenting the natural world and things he found interesting.In 1918, Edwin Way Teale enlisted in the Student Army Training Corps, but was discharged only two months later. He then transferred to Earlham College, where his uncle, David Edwards, was President. It was at Earlham where he met Nellie Imogene Donovan. She was instrumental in his life as a wife, friend, assistant and editor. Edwin's major in college was English, and he was active in many clubs and sports teams including the Football Team, Oratory Club and Debating Team.After graduating from Earlham in 1922, Edwin took a job as head of the department of public speaking and debate at Friend's University in Wichita, Kansas. Nellie graduated in the spring of 1923 and they were married on 1 August. The Teales stayed for one more year at Friend's, Edwin continued teaching while Nellie became the athletic director.The Teales then journeyed to New York, where Edwin entered Columbia University. While obtaining his Masters degree and working on his thesis paper entitled Jeffries Criticism of Wordsworth and Scott he submitted his editorials to Dr. Crane, a noted editorial writer. During this time the Teales had their only child, David. After graduating, Teale had hopes of getting a job on the editorial staff of Columbia Dispatch, but after several months of waiting for the official offer and a dwindling bank account, Edwin was forced to try his luck in New York. It was here where he began his decade long career at Popular Science. Edwin wrote on average, four articles an issue, some ghost-written, anonymous or written using pen names. In 1942, after having success with freelance articles, and his first few books ( A Book About Gliders, The Golden Throng), he resigned to work full time for himself.The following years were filled with happiness and great sadness. Although Edwin's career as a writer, photographer and public speaker prospered, David joined the army at 18. While on a reconnaissance mission in Germany, David was killed when a bomb sunk the small boat he was on. David and several others drowned. For almost a year, David's status was Missing in Action. After months of inquiries they finally discovered most of what happened and were given the official letter by the government. As Edwin stated, the only thing that kept them from despair was their love of nature.In 1959, Edwin and Nellie decided to move from their home in Baldwin, New York, to a more rural area. After touring the area in a hot-air balloon they decided to purchase a seventy-nine acre property in Hampton, Connecticut they named “Trail Wood”. He documented their quest for the perfect home in his book entitled A Naturalist Buys an Old Farm. Frequently the Teales welcomed visitors: fans, hikers and naturalists wishing a tour, or just to explore the property. Edwin and Nellie were members of such organizations and societies as the Thoreau Society, the Explorer's Club, the John Burroughs Memorial Association and the New York Entomological Society. They were good friends with many other naturalists and kept extensive correspondence, with relatives, friends, fans, and other influential people including Rachel Carson, Roger Tory Peterson, William T. Davis, and Julian Burroughs. His 32 books have been published in many languages, as well as in Braille. He won the Pulitzer prize in 1966, and received the Burroughs Medal in 1943 for his book, Near Horizons, among other awards and honors. His fans continued to send Edwin and Nellie letters even after his death in October 1980. Edwin and Nellie chose to donate their materials to the University of Connecticut Libraries and preserved Trail Wood by donating it to the Connecticut Audubon Society. It is now known as the Edwin Way Teale Memorial Sanctuary and is seasonally open for tours., Edwin Way Teale, Connecticut-based naturalist, was the author of thirty-two books. His papers include field notes and drafts for each of his books, early childhood writings, professional writings for magazines, newspapers and book reviews, correspondence- both personal and professional, personal and family documents, scrapbooks, and memorabilia, as well as his photographs (prints, negatives, and transparencies) and his personal library. There is also one box of original John Burroughs material Teale collected over the years.
Ellen Emmet Rand Papers
The collection is divided into three major series. Series I: includes biographical information collected on the Emmet family, a small collection of family photographs, a dozen stereographs of candid shots and family portraits, a collection of newspaper clippings related to Rand's work and her family (1906-1954), photographs of Ellen Emmet Rand's portraits (1904-1930), exhibition catalogues, and Rand's medals for submitted work. Series II: collects the correspondences to and from Rand; these correspondences cover both personal communication and professional interests (1907-1942). Series III: includes Rand's personal diaries (1927-1941)., The personal and professional papers of Connecticut artist Ellen Emmet Rand., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The collection was donated by the family in 2015.
Ercolini Bookplate Collection
The collection was purchased in 1974.
Guides to Literary and Artistic Expression Collections
Guides to collections relating to literary and artistic expression in the UConn Archives and Special Collections., Guides to collections relating to literary and artistic expression in the UConn Archives and Special Collections., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries
Joe Snow Punk Rock Collection
Collection contains empeheral items of the punk and hardcore scene in Connecticut from the late 1970s to the late 2000s. Materials range from textual graphic materials in zine form, stickers, photographs, show flyers, and set lists to audio recordings on cassette, vinyl and compact disc. Additionaly the collection contains 3 dimensional objects such as buttons and a shoe., Material collected by Joe Snow from multiple sources in the Connecticut punk scene from the 1970s to 2000s. Incas records acquired by Joe Snow from label co-founder Joe Diaz of Lost Generation, some show flyers accrued from Nancy Breslow, art work and Incas co-founder Badbob Therrian., Preferred Citation: [Item description, #:#], Joe Snow Punk Rock Collection. Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries., Joe Snow was involved in the Connecticut Punk rock and Hardcore scene from the 1980s to the late 2000s. As an amateur photographer, musician, Gordon and Smith sponsored skateboarder, Incas record label manager and record collector, Joe's interests led to a documentation of the music scene over a 20 year period. Joe Lived near Danbury, Connecticut during his show going days and would frequent such venues as Club Esquire, Hotel St. George, Ron's Place, Snakepit, Anthrax Club and other venues frequented by straight-edge hardcore and punk kids. The record store Trash American Style was an important Danbury source for music and scene information. Traveling on occasion to venues in New York and The Living Room in Providence. In the mid 2000s, Joe resurrected the Incas Record label from Lost Generation front man Joe Diaz., This collection contains flyers, venue calendars, fanzines, posters, photographs, LPs, 45s, cassettes, buttons, tee-shirts and ephemera from Connecticut's hardcore punk and skateboarding scene.
Louise Gaffney Flannigan Papers
The Louise Gaffney Flannigan Papers consist of 52 poems and writings written by Louise, mostly in the late 1880s, in her unofficial position as "poetess" of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen Lodge #201 of New Haven, Connecticut. Most of the poems were written in memorial to railroad brakemen who died in the line of duty or in celebration of their work. Interesting items in the collection include an undated jingle Louise wrote in praise of Solution Soap; a report of a visit Louise and her husband Frank made to a Chicago, Illinois, home for "crippled" brakemen, with a request for donations from the members of the New Haven lodge; a 1895 poem written on the "terrible sea disaster of the Steamer Elbe" which sank in the North Sea off of the coast of England; and a ten-page description of a train trip Louise and her husband Frank took in 1897 from New Haven, Connecticut, to California, where she describes the journey in great detail, including her impressions of Indians., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, Louise B. Gaffney Flannigan was born on June 14, 1867, in New Haven, Connecticut, in a house on Portsea Street (possibly 272 Portsea Street). As the sister and then wife of railroad men, Louise was the "poetess" of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen Lodge #201, in New Haven, Connecticut (also referred to as the Elm City Lodge), whose members were employed by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. Louise wrote poems and memorials to those who died in the line of duty, or in celebration of their heroism and fortitude. Some of her writings were published in such magazines as The American Federationist and The Railroad Brakemen’s Journal, and in the local newspaper, the New Haven Register. A Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen Lodge, #388 (possibly number 336), in Needles, California, was named in honor of Louise Gaffney Flannigan. Louise married Francis J. Flannigan (Frank), a railroad brakeman, in 1889. Louise and Frank had seven children – Frederick, Isabel, Elvira, Frank, Viola, Rhetta Louise, and Virginia. Frank Flannigan was born on March 21, 1864, in Ireland. Family legend describes his early life in this way: Frank came to the United States through Canada and was put into an orphanage in New York City. He ran away from the orphanage and "went out west" to join the army. On a train going west he met a man named Dave Medill who befriended him. Medill told him that when he got out of the army to come to New Haven, Connecticut, and he would help him get a job on the railroad, the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad . Frank did just that -- when he got to New Haven, Medill helped him find a room and board and sent him to the Portsea Street address where he met Louise. Frank died in a railroad accident on February 11, 1915. His death is described, again through family legend, in this way: The railroad switched its warning system for incoming trains from bells to electric flashing lights. Frank did not know the switch had taken place that day and was crushed to death by a train. This took place at Union Station in New Haven, Connecticut. Louise would not sue the railroad after Frank's death and the railroad apparently promised to hire her children for jobs with the railroad if they so wished. Family legend also has it that Louise's brother Fred, known as "Gaff" (and referred to frequently in her poems and writings), went off to fight in the Spanish American War (1898-1899) but came down ill with diptheria and "Louise brought him home to die." Little is known about Louise's life after Frank's death except that she lived in her sister Isabella's house on Portsea Street and herself worked for the railroad "in the office" until she retired in 1936. Louise died on May 2, 1949. Both Frank and Louise are buried at St. Bernard Cemetery in West Haven, Connecticut., The Louise Gaffney Flannigan Papers were donated in June 2007., Louise Gaffney Flannigan (1867-1949) of New Haven, Connecticut, was the sister and wife of railroad brakemen, and frequently wrote poems and other writings about railroad workers, particularly those who were members of the Brotherhood of Railroad Brakemen Elm City Lodge #201 in New Haven, in memorial to those who died while in service to the railroad, or in celebration of their good work and bravery. The Papers consist of poems and writings, including about train trips she took to Orlando, Florida in 1888, and to California in 1897.
Raab Associates Prize for Illustration Collection
The Raab Associates Prize for Illustration began in 1999, initiated by 1980 University of Connecticut Alumna, Susan Salzman Raab. Ms. Raab’s experience in the retail book business and at publishing houses led her to found her own children's book marketing agency, Raab Associates, now based in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. Ms. Raab approached the curator of the Northeast Children's Literature Collection at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, Terri J. Goldich, with the idea of creating a contest open to UConn students of art to bring attention to the field of children's book illustration as well as encourage students interested in the arts and publishing. A cooperative agreement was developed with School of Fine Arts Professor Cora Lynn Deibler. Professor Deibler and Alison Paul, faculty member and donor to the Northeast Children’s Literature Collection, assign an entry for the contest as part of their fall curriculum. This contest is an intensive part of the curriculum and simulates a professional assignment, requiring many hours of work for the students and their teachers. In addition to a cash award provided by Ms. Raab and her husband, David Raab, the winners receive a year's membership in the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators courtesy of SCBWI President Stephen Mooser., Archives & Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut Libraries, The collection contains submissions from illustration students in the UConn School of Fine Arts for the annual contest to illustrate a text. The prize is awarded as part of the annual Connecticut Children's Bookfair.