Guide to the P.T. Barnum Research Collection

Descriptive Summary

Creator
P.T. Barnum; Nancy Fish; Jenny Lind; Charles S. Stratton; M. Lavinia Warren; others
Dates [inclusive]
1735-1988
Languages
Languages represented in the collection: English
Finding Aid Prepared By
Meghan Rinn
Repository
Bridgeport Public Library 925 Broad Street Bridgeport, Connecticut

Preferred Citation

[Name of Item], P.T. Barnum Research Collection (BHC-MSS 0001), Bridgeport History Center.

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Access and Use

Acquisition Information

The P.T. Barnum Research Collection is an artificial collection, and as such, has no single source. Rather, it has been assembled over the years. Research is being conducted to identify specific items from specific donors.

Access Restrictions

Collection is primarily available online through the Connecticut Digital Archive.

Preferred Citation

[Name of Item], P.T. Barnum Research Collection (BHC-MSS 0001), Bridgeport History Center.

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Indexing Terms

Corporate Name(s)

  • Barnum and London Circus
  • Barnum and Bailey
  • Barnum and Bailey--History.
  • Barnum and Bailey--People--1890-1900.
  • Barnum and Bailey--People--1900-1910.
  • Barnum's American Museum
  • Barnum Institute of Science and History
  • Bridgeport Scientific Society
  • Fairfield County Historical Society
  • P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth, and the Great London Circus combined with Sanger's Royal British Menagerie and Grand International Allied Shows
  • Tufts University

Personal Name(s)

  • Barnum, P. T. (Phineas Taylor), 1810-1891.
  • Barnum, P. T. (Phineas Taylor), 1810-1891--Correspondence
  • Bailey, James Anthony, 1847-1906
  • Bunker, Chang, 1811-1874.
  • Bunker, Eng, 1811-1874.
  • Fish, Nancy.
  • Hallett, Charity
  • Jumbo (Elephant)
  • Lind, Jenny, 1820-1887.
  • Magri, M. Lavinia (Mercy Lavinia), 1841-1919
  • Swan, Anna, 1846-1888
  • Thumb, Tom, 1838-1883

Subject(s)

  • Circus animals--1870-1880.
  • Circus animals--Pictorial works.
  • Circus animals--United States--History--19th century.
  • Circus owners.
  • Circus performers--1870-1880.
  • Circus performers--1880-1890.
  • Circus performers--1890-1900.
  • Circus performers--1900-1910.
  • Circus performers--1910-1920.
  • Circus performers--1920-1930.
  • Circus performers--United States.
  • Dwarfism
  • Entertainers--1840-1890.
  • Entertainers--1890-1900.
  • Entertainers--1900-1920.
  • Elephant trainers
  • Funeral service--United States.
  • Historical societies
  • Museums.
  • Museums--Fires and fire prevention
  • Museums--New York (State)--New York.
  • Museums--United States--History--19th century.
  • Natural history museums
  • Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Circus
  • Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Combined Shows--1920-1930.
  • Scientific societies
  • Women circus performers

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Biographies

P.T. Barnum Phineas Taylor (P. T.) Barnum was born in Bethel, Connecticut on 5 July, 1810. Barnum’s name is popularly associated with the Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth, but the circus was only one facet of his career. He didn’t begin his involvement with the circus until he was in his sixties, following an extraordinarily successful tenure as the proprietor of the American Museum in New York City (1842 to 1868). In some respects the circus can be viewed as his retirement project. Barnum was approached by entrepreneur William C. Coup, who asked him to be a partner and lend his name to the circus that he, Coup, was creating; Barnum’s name was already famous and would be a draw. James A. Bailey, a better known partner of Barnum’s, entered the picture in the 1880s.

Barnum’s early life is covered in his autobiographies Life of P.T. Barnum and Struggles and Triumphs, as well as later biographies written by others. As a boy, Barnum was particularly well loved by his namesake maternal grandfather, who himself was known for his practical jokes and keen sense of humor. The family had little money and when Barnum’s father died, his teenaged son went to work in an uncle’s general store to help support the family. Here he learned a great deal about the competitive nature of people, and was exposed to local characters who constantly tried to best others and stretched the truth in making deals.

In 1829 Barnum married tailoress Charity Hallett, despite her mother’s disapproval, and started his own store while also running a lottery in Bethel. At age 21, he also became a newspaperman, producing 160 issues of the weekly Herald of Freedom, which ran from 1831 to 1834. He began the paper in defiant response to the Danbury newspaper editor’s refusal to print Barnum’s opinions, which were primarily reactionary to the predominant Calvinist views in the area. Barnum himself had been raised in the Congregational church but turned to the Universalist religion which offered a more uplifting view of humanity. Never shy about voicing his opinions in print, Barnum was sued for libel three times and jailed for 60 days while the paper was in print.

During his time as the editor of the Herald of Freedom, P.T. and his wife Charity had their first child, Caroline, who was born May 27, 1833. A few months after her birth, the young family moved to New York City. Barnum tried various ways to make a living, from selling groceries to running a boarding house for visitors from Connecticut. A man from Redding, Connecticut, alerted him to the possibility of purchasing an elderly African American woman named Joice Heth, whose owner billed her as 161 years old and the former nurse to George Washington. Barnum was intrigued, and purchased and freed her, but in fact the crippled and elderly woman, suffering from dementia and delusions, had little choice but to travel around to be displayed and tell her tales of raising young George. Later in life Barnum explicitly wrote that he regretted this exploitation, and he supported the 13th amendment during his political career in the Connecticut State Legislature. But at the time, in his mid-twenties, his experience with Heth gave him a taste for showmanship, which propelled him to starting a new career. Heth passed in 1836.

Through a clever business deal in 1841, Barnum acquired Scudder’s Museum, a rather tired place on Broadway that had ceased to attract visitors. Rejuvenating this museum quickly became his passion, and helped cement his status as the father of popular entertainment in America.

Barnum's American Museum operated at the corner of Broadway and Ann Street from 1841 to 1865 until it was destroyed by a fire, and then moved to 539-541 Broadway until that building too was destroyed by a fire in 1868. Wisely, Barnum first transformed the museum’s exterior so that passersby would be curious and want to come in. He added thousands of exhibits of all kinds: inventions, artwork, historical artifacts, scientific curiosities, natural history specimens, items of questionable origin and authenticity, stuffed and live animals, performers and newsmakers. He created a performance hall where many lectures and plays were presented, including Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Barnum continually provided new exhibits, held contests, and showed the latest innovations, and did whatever else would attract people to come to the museum and return to see more. He even offered women the opportunity to vote for their preferred candidate in the presidential primary of 18__. He strove to provide educational amusements suitable for families, which was not widely done at the time. In the 1840s and 1850s, the museum became an extremely popular destination for the growing numbers of leisure travelers on a national and international level. This in turn helped to boost Barnum’s personal reputation at home and abroad.

In addition to the work of running the museum, Barnum promoted individual performers as a part of his business. His first such promotion was that of Charles S. Stratton, a little person whom Barnum met in Bridgeport while visiting his brother Philo Barnum. Charles was born in 1838 a rather large baby but his growth almost halted at around six months of age. Barnum was introduced to Charles when the boy was nearly five years old. At that time, Charles was only 24 inches (two feet or 60.96 centimeters) tall. He possessed an innate talent for performing, and was bright and personable. Barnum gave him his famous stage name, General Tom Thumb, taught him to perform, and they soon toured Europe and the United States, both of them becoming fabulously wealthy. Later on, Barnum engaged other little people including Stratton’s future wife, M. Lavinia Warren, Warren’s sister Minnie, and George Washington Morris Nutt, who was given the stage name of Commodore Nutt. Barnum also furthered the fame and career of Swedish opera singer Jenny Lind and created an international animal celebrity, Jumbo the Elephant.

Barnum maintained additional business interests based in Bridgeport, some successful, others not. In 1851 he helped to develop the eastern part of Bridgeport, located on the east side of the Pequonnock River. He also served as the president of the Pequonnock National Bank, which was incorporated in May 1851 with $200,000 capital. It opened in August of that same year, and the bank endured until 1913 when it merged with the First Bridgeport National Bank. The Pequonnock printed various banknotes, as well as checks. Like contemporary checks that allow for featured graphics, the Pequonnock Bank printed images on their checks. This included images of both P.T. Barnum and Barnum’s home Iranistan. Other relatives of Barnum’s were also involved with the bank, including the Seeley family.

By 1854 the property that Barnum had in east Bridgeport was worth over one million dollars. He tried to attract businesses into the area, and made loans to various businesses including one Jerome Clock Company which was based out of New Haven. At the time, Barnum had no knowledge that the Jerome Clock Company was about to go under due to bankruptcy, and the company’s financial disaster brought Barnum down as well, as he had guaranteed about $450,000. By 1856, Barnum was in ruin, left his home of Iranistan with his family, and had to deal with both derisive public commentary and bankruptcy proceedings. Barnum writes frankly about this experience in his own book, Struggles and Triumphs, focusing particularly on not only the devastation of the loss, but also praising all of those who reached out to help him recover his fortune. He reprints the offer from Charles S. Stratton to go on tour again with Barnum as General Tom Thumb, which he took Stratton up on, as well as notes the others who helped him through this time. He also explicitly writes about the impact of his faith while getting through this time.

The failure of his real estate venture did not deter Barnum from continuing to develop and help his chosen home of Bridgeport. He helped to establish Mountain Grove Cemetery (1849), Seaside Park (1865), and Bridgeport Hospital (1878), in addition to entering political life to represent the area in spite of stating that he found politics distasteful.

In the 1850s, Barnum considered a run for governor of Connecticut. This morphed into a run for election to the Connecticut State Legislature in 1865. He stated explicitly that this was because of his strong feelings about the abolition of slavery, and he was put in office as the representative of Fairfield County on April 3, 1865. He was chair of the State Agricultural Committee where he did excellent work, and was well remembered for his speech delivered on May 26, 1865 that rallied not only for the ratification of the 13th amendment which would abolish slavery, but giving African American men the vote as well. These strong feelings came from not only lessons learned with Joice Heth, but also his fierce Universalist beliefs which heavily promoted equality.

Barnum remained in the Connecticut Legislature for two terms, and he ran for U.S. Congress as a Republican in 1867. He was beaten by William H. Barnum, a relative. The national scrutiny painted P.T.’s showmanship in a negative light, and the Republican party platform was hurt by his presence on it. Barnum himself was unhappy with all the commotion, the loss was quite welcome.

However, this was not the end of Barnum’s political career. From 1875-1876, Barnum served as the mayor of Bridgeport. He was nominated by a committee from the local Republican party, and initially declined it. It wasn’t until he was assured by the opposition that this was intended to be a compliment that Barnum accepted. He was elected by the city in spite of the fact it was largely During his one year term, Barnum commissioned new lighting for Bridgeport’s streets, supported the entry of local African Americans into trade unions, enforced liquor laws due to his own belief and promotion of temperance, and vastly improved the local water supply.

Barnum’s public life was busy, but he also had family life. Three more daughters were born to the couple: Helen (b. 18 April 1840), Frances (b. 1 May 1842), and Pauline (b. 1 March 1846). Frances died in April of 1844 just before her second birthday. Caroline and Helen lived long lives, but Pauline passed away at age 31 in 1877.

Barnum and Charity’s marriage was happy for some years, with Barnum writing in his autobiography that, “Although I was only little more than nineteen years old when I was married, I have always felt assured that if I had waited twenty years longer I could not have found another woman so well suited to my disposition and so admirable and valuable in every character as a wife, a mother, and a friend.” However as the couple grew older, changes occurred in their relationship that put distance between them. Barnum traveled frequently and for long periods of time, leaving Charity to raise their children. Charity apparently suffered from several unnamed health issues and did not have the energy, nor possibly the inclination, to keep up with her highly energetic husband; Barnum’s business ventures repeatedly put their financial stability at great risk which Charity undoubtedly found distressing. Barnum also began drinking heavily during the 1840s which impacted both the marriage and business relationships, although he came to realize this in 1849. He became a Temperance advocate after that, never drinking again and going on the lecture circuit to encourage others to do the same.

The interests of the two were probably also at odds on topics of theatre and entertainment about which Charity was far more conservative. Charity accompanied her husband on some of his tours, but according to Barnum she did not enjoy them. She had little love of Europe and was quite afraid of Niagara Falls, although their daughters enjoyed these experiences. Caroline’s diary, located at the Bridgeport History Center, offers insight into these family trips. According to Barnum, Charity was also not interested in “style,” so the wealth that allowed him to purchase expensive furnishings for their homes was not necessarily something she cared about. These differences and change in their relationship did not breed ill will, and Barnum was attentive in his own way. Their second home, the Italianate style Lindencroft, had gardens explicitly to indulge Charity’s enjoyment of gardening and their third home, the Victorian mansion Waldemere, was built close to Long Island Sound since the doctor recommended the sea air for Charity’s health.

As a grandfather, photographs show Barnum to be very happy to sit and pose with his many grandchildren. Caroline Barnum (27 May 1833-10 May 1911) married David W. Thompson on 19 October 1852. The couple had two children, Frances Barnum Thompson, later Leigh (27 December 1853-27 January 1939) and Phineas Taylor Barnum Thompson (19 April 1865-27 February 1868). Helen Barnum, later Helen Hurd and then Helen Buchtel (18 April 1840-December 1915) had Helen Barnum Hurd (12 November 1858-1933), Julia Hurd (1860-1891) and Caroline Hurd (1862-1883) as well as Lelia Buchtel (no known dates.) Pauline (1 March 1846-11 April 11) married Nathan Seeley. They had Clinton Barnum Seeley (1868-1856), Herbert Seeley (1870-1914), and Jessica Seeley (1872-1896). There are several images of Charity sitting with her husband and the grandchildren as well, although there are no accounts remarking on her feelings towards her grandchildren.

Barnum was in England when Charity died on November 19, 1873. He remained there rather than attend the funeral, a decision which was probably based on the impracticality of transatlantic travel, which would have taken weeks. Charity was buried in Mountain Grove Cemetery in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Soon after Charity’s death, Barnum married an English woman named Nancy Fish, the daughter of his friend and agent John Fish. The couple was secretly married in England on February 14, 1874, only three months after Charity’s death. The marriage remained secret from almost everyone, including Nancy’s parents and Barnum’s children, until September 15, 1874, when the two had a public ceremony at the Church of the Divine Paternity on Fifth Avenue in New York City.

The May-December element of the marriage was remarked upon, as Nancy was born in 1850 and was thus 40 years Barnum’s junior, but the couple was generally happy together. Barnum traveled and conducted business, and while Nancy occasionally suffered from ill health, as Charity had in her lifetime, the two seemed to get along and shared a similar sense of humor, as well as enjoyment of the luxuries that wealth afforded them. The marriage also allowed Nancy to pursue her own hobbies, including collecting, reading, writing, horseback riding and carriage riding, and playing pianoforte. Barnum constructed Marina, his last home in Bridgeport, Connecticut, explicitly for Nancy, knowing she would outlive him and want a home more easily maintained than Waldemere, as well as one that allowed room for her interests and activities.

Barnum’s circus venture did not begin until 1871. He was approached by the showman William C. Coup, who had worked for Barnum many years previous. Barnum was familiar with Coup and respected his talents; Coup was interested in a partnership that would allow him to capitalize on Barnum’s fame by using his name, thus was born “P. T. Barnum’s Grand Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan and Circus.” The new network of railroads expanding across the country allowed the circus to travel far more efficiently and to reach more towns and cities than had been possible by wagon. Train travel also allowed the circus to become a much larger operation since the trains could transport innumerable wagons and tons of canvas for tents. The profits were incredibly high. By 1872, Barnum was nurturing the side show - a traveling version of the many performers who exhibited themselves in the American Museum - and the attraction proved to be popular. In 1873, Barnum built up a department in the circus dedicated only to advertising, and the success continued.

On April 30, 1874, Barnum opened the New York Hippodrome which also featured circus acts. The Hippodrome would go on to have both a permanent home in New York City, and a traveling component. A year later, P. T. Barnum’s Traveling World’s Fair was managed by John O’Brien. The sheer number of shows made it necessary for Barnum to create the Barnum Universal Exposition Company to manage it all. Financial issues and dissatisfaction dissolved the O’Brien partnership, and the Barnum Universal Exposition Company closed as well by the end of 1875. Starting in 1876, Barnum’s circus was now simply the “Greatest Show on Earth” and proved to be a major success.

In the 1880s, Barnum began to encounter competition from other circuses. This included the Great London Show of Cooper, Bailey, and Hutchinson--several name variations of this circus exist--whom Barnum eventually embraced as partners. The process involved a lot of legal negotiations, but on August 26, 1880, the Barnum and London Circus emerged. Great success continued, and by the mid-1880s the circus employed over seven hundred people. In 1887, disagreements prompted the partners to renegotiate contracts, dissolve existing partnerships, and the Barnum and Bailey Circus emerged. The younger partner, James A. Bailey, largely managed the circus, and continued on after Barnum’s death in 1891. After Bailey died in 1906, the circus was bought by Ringling Brothers, and continued to operate separately until the two shows were combined in 1919.

P. T. Barnum died on April 7, 1891 following a stroke. He was ill for some months prior to his death. He is buried in Mountain Grove Cemetery, a park-like cemetery that he was instrumental in creating. The Barnum family plot is close to the Stratton family plot where Charles S. Stratton and M. Lavinia Warren, known as General and Mrs. Tom Thumb, are buried. A number of Barnum’s children and grandchildren are also in the same cemetery.

The American Museum Barnum's American Museum was located on Broadway at Ann Street from 1841 to 1865 until it was destroyed by a fire, and then moved to 539-541 Broadway until it too was destroyed by a fire in 1868.

The museum was originally known as Scudder's Museum, which opened in 1810. Managed by John Schdudder, Schudder's American Museum featured a number of displays, including seashells, minerals, and taxidermied animals including a bison, along with wax figures. After Schudder passed, his heirs took on the museum, but a combination of poor management, and the financial crash of 1837 lead the family to sell the collection. Barnum acquired it through a proxy in the museum building's owner, Francis Olmsted. After Barnum acquired everything, he substantially dressed up the exterior, decorating it with flags and banners and dozens of painted plaques featuring wild animals practically overnight. He paid musicians to stand out on the balcony and perform to attract passersby and soon people flocked to the museum. Barnum later expanded the building to include a large theatre, which he called a lecture room since the word “theatre” had unsavory connotations at that time.

Displays in the museum ranged from dioramas of places such as Niagara Falls and the American plains, to wax figures, performers, theatrical performances, artwork, historical artifacts, scientific specimens, inventions, and curiosities. In addition Barnum displayed live animals, including Beluga whales and hippopotami. Among the exhibits Barnum included what were then called humbugs, or hoaxes; he encouraged the public to decide whether they were genuine or not, thereby avoiding accusations of falsely claiming authenticity. The Feejee Mermaid is perhaps the best known among Barnum's humbugs, and was an item he rented from Boston showman, Moses Kimball. Barnum's performers included trained bears, and Native Americans who performed songs and dances of their culture, to people he called natural wonders and living curiosities, depending on the advertisement. Notably, he avoided using the word ”freak” when publicizing performers with distinctive physical differences, such as giants and little people, albinos, excessively thin or fat people or those with missing or additional limbs. These performers made a good living exhibiting themselves at the American Museum, in concert halls, and on tours through joint companies and later, circuses. Barnum’s promotions ensured their success and a substantial income, which gave long-serving veterans of the museum the means to retire in comfort. Some of the best known performers at the museum included Anna Swan Bates, General Goshen, Charles S. Stratton - known as General Tom Thumb, Chang and Eng Bunker - the origin of the term Siamese twins, and M. Lavinia Warren. Barnum also hosted concerts and lectures, as well as contests at the American Museum. These contests included the National Poultry Show, beauty contests, flower shows, and baby shows which awarded prizes for the fattest baby, the handsomest twins, and other categories.

The museum was not, however, the product of Barnum’s effort alone. Barnum employed a number of staff to help with the museum in various capacities. Chief among them was John Greenwood Junior, who was raised in Bethel, Connecticut, as Barnum was. Trained as a hatter, Greenwood fulfilled a number of roles at the museum, including treasurer, temporary museum owner from 1851 to 1855, and manager. Other tasks included traveling to find new relics for the museum, and at one time, showing the Prince of Wales himself around the American Museum. Other key personnel included pantomimist-turned-stage manager Charles Kemble Fox, orchestra director W.J. Peterschen, manager-turned-aquaria department manager Dr. Oscar Kohn, and promoter-turned-superintendent Sylvester Bleeker. Barnum’s two son-in-laws, Samuel Hurd and David Thompson, also held positions within the museum.

On July 13, 1865, Barnum's American Museum burned to the ground, apparently the work of arsonists, possibly Southern sympathizers who did not like Barnum’s vocal opposition to slavery. Performers and employees were able to get out, but most of the animals did not, and those that did were killed because they were running loose on the streets. Thousands upon thousands of objects in the museum were destroyed. Barnum learned of the catastrophe while in Hartford, Connecticut, fulfilling his duties as a State Representative

Barnum's American Museum had a second incarnation at a nearby location, 539-541 Broadway. The content of the museum was similar, and miraculously Barnum’s managers had it in operation only a few months after the first museum’s demise. But the second one did not last long, as it burned on March , 1868, due to a heating system failure. Barnum did not attempt to re-open a third museum. Instead, he took the advice of his long-time friend Horace Greeley to “go a-fishing” and enjoy the fruits of his labors, as well as spend time with his many grandchildren.

Circus and Winter Quarters P.T. Barnum is most heavily associated with circus entertainment, but his venture into that world did not begin until 1871. He was approached by the showman William C. Coup, who had worked for Barnum many years previous. Barnum was familiar with Coup and respected his talents; Coup was interested in a partnership that would allow him to capitalize on Barnum’s fame by using his name, thus was born “P.T. Barnum’s Grand Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan and Circus.” Notably, the word “Museum” leads the list, and including a “museum” in this and every subsequent circus was something Barnum insisted upon. Acts from the old American Museum, including Anna Swan and William Henry Johnson - known as the What Is it? - joined this circus. Featuring over one hundred wagons to carry everything for the show, it grossed over $400,000.

The new network of railroads expanding across the country allowed the circus to travel far more efficiently and to reach more towns and cities than had been possible by wagon. Train travel also allowed the circus to become a much larger operation since the trains could transport innumerable wagons and tons of canvas for tents. The profits were incredibly high. By 1872, Barnum was nurturing the side show - a traveling version of the many performers who exhibited themselves in the American Museum - and the attraction proved to be incredibly popular. In 1873, Barnum built up a department in the circus dedicated only to advertising, and the success continued.

On 30 April, 1874, Barnum opened the New York Hippodrome which also featured circus acts. The Hippodrome would go on to have both a permanent home in New York City, and have a traveling component. A year later, P.T. Barnum’s Traveling World’s Fair was managed by John O’Brien. The sheer number of shows with Barnum’s made it necessary for Barnum to create the Barnum Universal Exposition Company to manage it all. Financial issues and dissatisfaction dissolved the O’Brien partnership, and the Barnum Universal Exposition Company closed as well by the end of 1875. Starting in 1876, Barnum’s circus was now simply the “Greatest Show on Earth” and proved to be a massive success.

In the 1880s, Barnum began to encounter competition from other circuses. This included the Great London Show of Cooper, Bailey, and Hutchinson - other names of this circus also existed - whom Barnum eventually embraced as partners. The processed involved a lot of legal negotiations, but on 26 August, 1880, the Barnum and London Circus emerged. Great success continued, and by the mid-1880s the circus employed over seven hundred people. In 1887, disagreements prompted the partners to renegotiate contracts, dissolve existing partnerships, and the Barnum and Bailey Circus emerged. The younger partner, James A. Bailey, largely managed the circus, and continued on after Barnum’s death in 1891. Bailey died in 1906, and the Ringling Brothers bought the circus. They operated it separately from their own circus until 1919, when the two were combined to become Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth. This show continued until 2017.

The winter quarters for the various Barnum named circuses were housed in Bridgeport, CT, with permanent buildings being put up in 1880s. Barnum liked having the quarters in Connecticut because it allowed him to show some of his animals during the winter months, including loans to Central Park’s zoo. The five acres of land provided storage for railroad cars, steam heated rooms for animals, wagons, tents, prop fabrication, and a stable. The location of the Winter Quarters was also a boon for the local Bridgeport economy, thanks to the demands and the number of people involved.

A fire began at the winter quarters on 20 November, 1887. It ignited at the main building at ten in the evening, and could not be contained. The only animal survivors were the elephants, the cause of the blaze remaining unknown. The quarters were then rebuilt, only to be burned down again in 1924.

Jumbo the Elephant Jumbo the Elephant (1861-15 September 1885) was an unusually tall African elephant best known for his time as an attraction in the London Zoo and as a part of P.T. Barnum's circus from 1882 to his death in 1885. He is arguably the first international animal celebrity, and even today, his name remains widely recognized.

Born in the Sudan, the one-year-old elephant who became Jumbo was taken by hunters after they killed his mother. He was then sold to an Italian animal dealer, and eventually sent to the famous Jardin des Plantes in Paris. In 1865 he was transferred to the London Zoo as part of a trade, and was placed under the care of Matthew Scott, who at the time looked after the zoo’s birds but had no experience with elephants. The young elephant was rather sickly when he arrived from Paris, and was not at all large for his age. Scott carefully tended the elephant, won his trust, and Jumbo eventually began to thrive. He was trained to give rides around the park to visitors of all ages, earning him the love of the public, especially children.

In 1881, P.T. Barnum’s managers made an offer to the London Zoo to purchase Jumbo. This was well timed for the zoo, as the now teenaged Jumbo was experiencing musth. This natural development in male elephants, characterized by high levels of testosterone and aggression, made Jumbo hard for the zoo to handle and rendered him unable to do his regular duties of giving visitors rides and interacting with the public. Because of Jumbo’s repeated destruction of the elephant house, the London Zoo’s director was secretly happy for the opportunity to sell him. Jumbo was purchased for $10,000 ($246,000 in present money), but the British public vociferously objected to the sale, unwilling to lose the elephant known as the “Children’s Giant Pet.” Barnum used the outrage to his advantage, and was able to generate money from the public interest in his Jumbo acquisition to offset the expense of buying and transporting him across the Atlantic. Convincing the 11-½ foot tall, 13,000 pound elephant to enter a shipping crate for the ocean crossing required weeks of work and taxed the patience of all who were effecting the procedure, but delighted the disapproving public in England.

As Barnum did in the months prior to Jenny Lind’s arrival in New York City, his advance promotion of Jumbo generated a great deal of fanfare and anticipation of the famed elephant’s arrival. Jumbo became a part of Barnum's circus, and was a major draw. Merchandise of all kinds featured Jumbo, even household items like ceramic pitchers, tin plates, and glass bottles. His image was used heavily in advertising for a variety items ranging from receipt books to sewing thread, all capitalizing on the idea of an elephant’s strength and endurance.

Jumbo traveled all over the United States and Canada with Barnum’s circus, which used the ever expanding railways to reach audiences in every corner of both nations. Unlike the Asian elephants in the show, Jumbo did not perform tricks --Jumbo only had to be himself to attract the crowds, so impressive was he for his size and large, flapping ears (Asian elephants’ ears are much smaller). Tragically, on September 15,1885, Jumbo was struck by a train in St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada, while returning to sleeping quarters after a performance one night. No trains had been scheduled that evening and it was thus thought safe to walk along the tracks, the shortest route.

Following Jumbo’s death, Barnum engaged well known taxidermist Henry Ward of Rochester, New York to preserve and re-assemble both Jumbo's skin and skeleton as two separate displays. The “Double Jumbo” exhibit toured with the circus for one or two years, before the constituent parts went to permanent homes. The skeletal remains are at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, and the taxidermy elephant was gifted to Tufts University, eventually to become the school's mascot. The taxidermy Jumbo remained on display until a fire in April 1975 destroyed it.

A few pieces of Jumbo survive. After Jumbo’s death thin slices of his tusks were cut and engraved with the information, known as the scrimshaw technique. The Bridgeport History Center owns one of these cross sections of Jumbo’s tusk. At Tufts, his stuffed tail had been removed earlier because of students tugging on it, and had been placed in the archives for safekeeping. After the fire destroyed Jumbo’s taxidermied form, his ashes were gathered into a 14 ounce peanut butter jar, which is now a talisman for the Tufts sports teams.

Jenny Lind Jenny Lind was a Swedish-born opera singer, popularly known as “The Swedish Nightingale,” who lived from 6 October 1820-2 November 1887. During her lifetime, she became one of the best known singers in the Western hemisphere, who was also beloved and admired for her generous philanthropic spirit. She toured Europe, the United Kingdom, and the United States giving concerts, frequently donating to charities in the places she visited. In her later life she taught at the Royal College of Music in London as a professor of singing.

P. T. Barnum, who had never heard Lind sing when he invited her to tour America, capitalized on her both her musical reputation and her renowned charitable nature. Knowing that Americans knew little about opera but would adore a woman whose remarkable voice embodied an equally sweet and virtuous soul, Barnum set about promoting Jenny Lind’s 1850-1851 Tour of America in a way that no one else could match.

Lind’s childhood was less than ideal and she spent her early years living in different households; her mother had never married Lind’s father. Quite by accident, her exceptional voice was recognized when she was a child, and at age nine, Lind entered the acting school of the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Sweden; she began singing on stage a year later. She gained a number of prestigious roles in the Royal Swedish Opera, and by 1840, she was not only a part of the Royal Swedish Academy of Music, but also the court singer to the King of Sweden in Norway. Her light, agile voice would eventually be characterized as a coloratura soprano.

She continued to train and sing in the 1840s, and began to tour as well. In 1843, while touring Denmark, she caught the attention of Hans Christian Anderson; it is said he fell in love and wrote the Ugly Duckling and the Emperor’s Nightingale in her honor, but Lind did not share his feelings, and remained just a friend. A year later she sang in Berlin, where the German audiences took to her immediately, as well as composers including Felix Mendelssohn. She continued to sing in Europe, and then in 1847, in the United Kingdom where she performed in front of Queen Victoria.

In 1849, P.T. Barnum approached Lind about a possible American tour. Lind had previously received offers to go to America, but had declined them. She responded to Barnum because the letterhead depiction of his elaborate new home, Iranistan, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, intrigued her. It is said that Lind felt the exotic mansion meant Barnum wasn't just trying to cash in on her talent, but knew what he was doing when it came to promoting. She did not jump quickly at the opportunity, however.

First she insisted upon a contract with a strict financial arrangement before she would set foot on a ship to America. The money to be paid her, her pianist Jules Benedict, baritone Giovanni Belletti, and others in her entourage, was to be placed in an escrow account in London. Barnum scrambled to raise the full amount, since even with his wealth he did not have the $187,000 needed on hand. Arrangements were made for a year-long tour to begin in September 1850.

Despite Lind’s name being largely unknown in North America, P.T. Barnum was able to whet the public’s appetite for the performer months in advance, and upon her arrival create an insatiable demand that soon turned into “Lindmania.” Every conceivable product, including items of clothing and accessories, furniture, household goods and decorations, framed prints, sheet music, even locomotives and ships were identified by the name Jenny Lind, a scale of mass merchandizing theretofore unheard of. Barnum did not directly profit from the sale of the innumerable consumer products bearing her name, but he did leverage their great popularity.

Barnum’s advance publicity was so successful that when Lind arrived in New York City along with Giovanni Belletti and Julius Benedict, they were greeted by throngs of crowds. First performing at Castle Garden in New York City on 11 September, 1850, Lind's concerts were a runaway success. The Barnum-Lind tour covered both the United States and Cuba, and the profits were extremely high. Barnum also developed a concert ticket auction scheme that benefitted both himself and the owners of the commercial enterprises that won the auctions and thus brought their business name into the limelight.

True to her word, Lind donated much of the money she earned on tour to charities in the cities where she performed, as well as to Swedish ones. Barnum, the master promoter, used that fact to further elevate Lind's moral character as well as her vocal performance abilities. Newspaper articles of the period typically comment on both her indescribable voice and her generous gifts to the local hospital, orphanage, or charity organization, especially those for women and children.

All of the marketing and the heavy concert schedule, however, began to wear on Lind. She had also fallen in love with the pianist who replaced Benedict, Otto Goldschmidt. They were married on 5 February, 1852, in Boston. Possibly Goldschmidt influenced his wife to take advantage of a clause in her contract with Barnum that allowed the two to part ways with certain conditions to the terms, and she did so. Despite Barnum’s disappointment, the two parted on relatively good terms, and remained friends. The Lind company continued to perform in America until May of 1852, and then returned to England. Lind and Goldschmidt had three children.

In later years Lind gave fewer performances and no longer performed operas, but she did participate in concert hall performances around Europe. In 1882, she became professor of singing at the Royal College of Music. She remained in that position until 2 November 1887, when she passed away.

Jenny Lind Goldschmidt is buried at the Great Malvern Cemetery in Malvern, Worcestershire, England.

Charles S. Stratton Charles S. Stratton, best known as General Tom Thumb (4 January 1838-15 July, 1883) was an entertainer who worked for P.T. Barnum, and married fellow Barnum performer Mercy Lavinia Warren. His natural charisma and talent, combined with his being a proportionate dwarf, helped propel him to the status of celebrity in the 19th century.

Stratton was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, to Sherwood and Cynthia Stratton. His father was a carpenter, and his mother was a homemaker with two daughters and a son by the time Charles was born. The family was not impoverished by contemporary standards, they had little to get by on. When Charles was born, he was over nine pounds, but at around six or and seventh months of age, he failed to grow, so that even at four years old, his height had not changed and he was a mere 24 inches.

P.T. Barnum met the Stratton family towards the in of 1842. Barnum was in Bridgeport due to a frozen over Hudson River, and taking advantage of the fact his brother Philo owned the Franklin House hotel. Barnum remembered hearing of the diminutive boy in Bridgeport, and asked his brother to go and get the family. “Charlie” was bright and affable, and Barnum responded to his charm; he felt that the boy could be taught to act, and wanted him to come and perform at his new American Museum in New York City.

A business arrangement was negotiated with Stratton’s parents, and it was agreed that Barnum could exhibit Charles for an experimental month, for $3.00 plus room, board, and travel expenses. As a result, Charles headed to New York City with Barnum in 1843, and was given the stage name “General Tom Thumb.”

Charles took to showbusiness, and Barnum taught him various acts, quips, and everything needed to do a good performance. Charles had an innate skill for this kind of work, and after Barnum made a few introductions to the press (often by barging into homes unannounced), General Tom Thumb made his debut at the American Museum. The reception was warm, but word of mouth boosted the success of the act. In his promotions, Barnum exaggerated the boy’s age, stating it was eleven rather than five, to make Charles’ tiny stature seem even more impressive.

Such acclaim enabled a tour of Europe a year later, with Stratton giving not one but two command performances in front of Queen Victoria, within the space of eight days. Stratton quickly became a favourite at the courts he visited, including in France and Belgium, and such warm receptions continued whenever he toured in Europe.

Stratton remained in show business in his teenage years and into his twenties, alternatively touring the country and performing at Barnum’s American Museum. It was in his mid-twenties that he met M. Lavinia Warren, a new Barnum performer, and the two began an acquaintance that rapidly turned romantic. Just two months later Warren and Stratton married in an event orchestrated by Barnum known as the Fairy Wedding. The wedding took place on 10 February 1863 at Grace Episcopal Church in New York City, and became the social event of the year, along with the lavish reception afterwards. This was during the American Civil War when newspapers were filled with the tragic news of battles and casualties; to the delight of the American public, the Fairy Wedding stole the show briefly and became front-page news in numerous papers and magazines.

The couple was received at the White House by President Abraham Lincoln and his wife Mary Todd Lincoln, a memorable event for all. Afterwards, Charles and Lavinia embarked on a three year world tour, along with Lavinia’s sister Minnie Warren, and fellow Barnum performer George Washington Morris Nutt, all of whom were little people. Charles and Lavinia became an international celebrity couple, America’s first. Following the tour, which added even more to their wealth, the Stratton alternated living at their home in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and their home in Lavinia’s hometown of Middleborough, Massachusetts. They continued to tour and entertain the public, and remained close friends and associates of Barnum’s. The marriage was generally considered a happy one, and they remained close throughout their lives.

In his leisure time, Charles enjoyed yachting and horse racing, and generally fancied himself a man of leisure, spending liberally on fine food and other luxuries. He was also generous, and gave money to worthy causes. He also was active in the Freemasons, joining the organization in 1862 and eventually becoming a 32nd degree mason, Knight Templar.

On 15 July 1883, Stratton suffered a stroke and passed away. He is buried at Mountain Grove Cemetery in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Lavinia remarried and lived until 1919; she asked to be buried with her first love, “Charlie” in the Mountain Grove Cemetery.

M. Lavinia Warren Mercy Lavinia Warren Bump, later Mercy Lavinia Warren Stratton, and then Mercy Lavinia Magri, (31 October, 1842-25 November, 1919) was an entertainer who worked for P.T, Barnum, managed her own theatre, and wed fellow Barnum performer Charles S. Stratton - known as General Tom Thumb.

Warren was born into the Bump family in Middleborough Massachusetts. Her family was prominent in the area, and capable of tracing their roots back to the Mayflower. She had seven other siblings, but only Warren and her sister Huldah Pierce Warren Bump (later known as Minnie Warren), had dwarfism.

Warren taught school for a time in Massachusetts, before entering show business at age sixteen. Her first foray into being an entertainer saw her under the employ of a cousin who owned a showboat in Mississippi. Barnum came to hear of her in 1862, meeting Warren when she was twenty one years old, and signed on to work for him for $10 a week plus expenses. It was there that she met Charles Stratton, known as General Tom Thumb and a fellow little person in Barnum’s employ, and the two began to date.

Eventually, Warren and Stratton married, in an event orchestrated by Barnum known as the Fairy Wedding, Held on 10 February 1863 at Grace Episcopal Church in New York City, the marriage became the social event of the year, as did the reception afterwards. The two were even received at the White House by President Abraham Lincoln.

Later on, Warren and her husband toured with her sister, Minnie Warren, and fellow performer George Washington Morris Nutt. The tour covered the United States and Canada, before heading to Europe. From there, their lives bounced between Stratton’s home in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and Warren’s in Middleborough, Massachusetts, when they weren’t touring and entertaining the public. The marriage between the two was generally considered a positive one, and they remained close throughout their lives.

Warren was also extremely close with her sister, Minnie, who wed a fellow Barnum performer named Major Edward Newell in July, 1877. Unlike her sister, Minnie and her husband did attempt to have children. Unfortunately the child was stillborn, and Minnie herself died after the delivery. Warren was devastated by the loss, and it took a while for her to come to terms with.

Charles Stratton passed on 15 July, 1883, leaving Warren a widow. She remarried two years later to Primo Magri, an Italian entertainer of a similar stature to Warren, on 6 April, 1885. They performed both at their own roadside stand in Middleborough, Massachusetts, and toured together along with Magri’s brother, Ernesto. The couple even appeared in the silent film, The Lilliputian's Courtship, in 1915.

Warren died on 25 November, 1919, and is buried besides Charles S. Stratton at Mountain Grove Cemetery.

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Scope and Content of Collection

The scope of the P.T. Barnum collection is wide, and reflects the many interests of its subject, P.T. Barnum. In addition to representing his own manuscript materials from all stages of his life, it collects the subjects of his business related interests, namely the American Museum, the Circus and the Winter Quarters at Bridgeport, Jenny Lind, Jumbo the Elephant, and Charles S. Stratton (General Tom Thumb) and the performers associated with Stratton. The content of each subseries varies, but all of them have booklets of information, advertisements, programs, and printed ephemera that speak to the marketing of the subject, their life, and why Barnum was willing to invest in their success. Manuscript material appears in certain series, but not all. Heavily represented though are images - both illustrations and photographs - of all subjects.

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Detailed Description of Records/Container List

Series I - P.T. Barnum 1881-1892 

boxfolder

To Gideon Wells, October 7, 1832  

1 1

Letter, Iranistan letterhead, c. 1840s  

1 2

To [Nate] Beers, October 5, 1847  

1 3

Invitation to Iranistan housewarming, November 14, 1848.  

1 4

To [Nate] Beers, October 26, 1849  

1 5

To Friend [Nate] Beers, February 6, 1852  

1 6

To Moses Kimball, February 6, 1852  

1 7

[Endorsed note] collateral signed by Nate Beers, August 14, 1854  

1 8

To Unknown, September 13, 1854  

1 9

To Gibbs and Johnston, October 15, 1854  

1 10

To Nate Beers, December 4, 1854  

1 11

To Henry B. Curtis, February 27, 1855  

1 12

To Messrs. Curtis and Scuilines, January 11, 1856  

1 13

Dear Sir, December 25, 1856?  

1 14

To Mr. Curtis, November 17, 1857  

1 15

To Edward Taylor, September 2, c. 1846-1857  

1 16

To H.B. Curtis, March 12, 1860  

1 17

To H.B. Curtis, February 14, 1861  

1 18

To F. Wildman, September 12, 1861  

1 19

To Captain Treat, November 28, 1861  

1 20

Tom Thumb as ‘rascal’ April 5, 1863  

1 21

To Nate Beers, July 4, 1864  

1 22

To Hon. D.L. Harris, July 12, 1864  

1 23

To F. L. Wildman, June 13, 1865  

1 24

To Master Miles L.W. Myers, November 23, 1866  

1 25

To Mr. Curtis, September 7, 1867  

1 26

To Nate [Beers], July 14, 1869  

1 27

To Nate Beers, Bills, November 18, 1869  

1 28

To Nate [Beers], March 15, 1870  

1 29

To Nate [Beers], April 3, 1870  

1 30

To Nate [Beers], January 9, 1871  

1 31

To Nate [Beers], July 11, 1871  

1 32

To Nate [Beers], October 31, 1871  

1 33

To Nate Beers, January 29. 1872  

1 45

To Sun editor, February 3, 1872  

1 35

To Nate [Beers], February 27, 1872  

1 36

To Beers, [Nate], April 16, 1872  

1 37

To Nate [Beers], May 21, 1872  

1 38

To Mr. Spier, May 29, 1872  

1 39

To Nate [Beer], June 6, 1872  

1 40

To Nate Beers, June 11, 1872  

1 41

To Eames, June 28, 1872  

1 42

To Nate Beers, July 26, 872  

1 43

To Emma [Beers], January 22. 1873  

1 44

To N.P. Beers, Esq. April 16, 1873  

1 45

To Nate [Beers], July 2, 1873  

1 46

To Nate [Beers], September 11, 1873  

1 47

To Joel (Beaton?) July 24, 1874  

1 48

To Nate Beers, September 9, 1874  

1 49

To Nate and Emma Beers, September 16, 1874  

1 50

To Mr. Auditor, December 30, 1875  

1 51

To Nate [Beers], July 28, 1876  

1 52

To [Beers], Nate, January 1, 1877  

1 53

To Wheeler, December 12, 1877  

1 54

To Nate [Beers], January 5, 1878  

1 55

To From Waldemere, May 9, 1878  

1 56

To Barnum to John A. White, June 19, 1878  

1 57

To J.A. White, June 21, 1878  

1 58

To Beers, Nate, October 21, 1878  

1 59

To Beers, Nate, January 2, 1879  

1 60

To Editors of the Mercury, May 10, 1879  

2 1

To Mr. J. DeMott Miller, September 29, 1879  

2 2

To Nate [Beers], December 8, 1879  

2 3

To Colonel, December 9, 1879  

2 4

To Nate [Beers], December 22, 1879  

2 5

To Nate Beers, undated, c. 1870s  

2 6

To Nate [Beers], January 3, 1880  

2 7

To Eames, June 8, 1880  

2 8

To Nate [Beers], June 11, 1880  

2 9

To Eames, 1881  

2 10

To Nate [Beers], April 3, 1881  

2 11

To Wheeler and Wilson Co., June 20, 1881  

2 12

To Samuel [?], January 15, 1882  

2 13

To Nate [Beers], December 31, 1882  

2 14

To Conant?, March 15, 1883  

2 15

To Nate Beers, January 1, 1884  

2 16

To R.B. Leacey, December 31, 1884  

2 17

To Mayor Morgan, February 23, 1885  

2 18

To Julian Sterling, March 28, 1885  

2 19

To Julian Sterling, April 15, 1885  

2 20

[Note on shares] July 13, 1885  

2 21

To James A. Bailey, October 4, 1885  

2 22

To Julian Sterling, January 13, 1886  

2 23

To Julian Sterling, January 14, 1886  

2 24

To Unknown recipient, Reference to Regis Falls, White Mountains, August 13, 1886  

2 25

To R. B. Leacey, September 6, 1886  

2 26

To Barnum to A.C. Sherwood, February 12, 1887  

2 27

To Nate Beers, May 25, 1887  

2 28

To Waldo [Curtis?], June 14, 1887  

2 29

To Editor of the London Times, December 25, 1887  

2 30

To George Curtis, March 1, 1888  

2 31

To James A. Bailey, July 5, 188  

2 32

To Barnum to David Pell (?), August 10, 1888  

2 33

To I. DeVer Warner, agreement signed by Barnum, November 20, 1888  

2 45

To Nate Beers, October 3, probably 1888  

2 35

James Bailey, probably 1888  

2 36

Knowlton, March 21, 1889  

2 37

To Doctor Talmage, September 9, 1889  

2 38

To Barjum to Julian Sterling, December 31, 1889  

2 39

To James A. Bailey, February 22, 1890  

2 40

To James A. Bailey, February 26, 1890  

2 41

To James A. Bailey, March 1, 1890  

2 42

To James A. Bailey, April 9, 1890  

2 43

To James E. Cooper, April 9, 1890  

2 44

Seeley collection, undated  

2 45

To Helen, Thanksgiving, no year  

2 46

To Nate [Beers], September 1, no year  

2 47

To Nate Beers, November 16, no year  

2 48

To Nate Beers, undated  

2 49

To Nate Beers, undated  

2 50

To Nate Beers, undated  

2 51

Envelopes associated with Nate Beers correspondence, undated  

2 52

To A.L. Cheney, undated  

2 53

To Higginson, undated  

2 54

Obituary and small note on Jumbo and baby elephant with Barnum’s signature  

2 55

Barnum monogram on envelope, undated  

2 56

Photographic prints and copies of letters  

2 57

Copies of letters from other collections  

2 58

Typescript copies of P.T. Barnum’s letters, 1855-1864  

2 59

From C.F. Dodge, January 24, 1844  

3 1

From Bishop, Backus and Noble, May 24, 1855  

3 2

From Bishop, Backus and Noble, January 3, 1856  

3 3

From G.F. Lewis, January 8, 1856  

3 4

From G. Wells regarding General Tom Thumb, January 4, 1859  

3 5

From Charles E. Sanford, April 11, 1872; banknote, September 13, 1872  

3 6

From Samuel L. Clemens/Mark Twain, May 24, 1875  

3 7

From L.B. Michael, August 7, 1875  

3 8

From M. Lavinia Warren Stratton, November 11, 1878  

3 9

John Lyon, August 19, 1881  

3 10

From H.R. Parrot, October 15, 1881  

3 11

From F.A. Lane and Cunningham and Son and Co. October 25, 188  

3 12

From Charles Treadly, December 26, 1881  

3 13

From Charles T. Barnum, January 20, 1882  

3 14

From Dr. George Benedict, February 10. 1882  

3 15

From Cousin Seely, February 10, 1882  

3 16

From Dr. George Benedict, February 17, 1882  

3 17

From Charles T. Barnum, February 24, 1882  

3 18

From S.T. Rogers, February 27, 1882  

3 19

From B.L. Swan, March 1, 1882  

3 20

From Unknown, March 2, 1882  

3 21

From Samuel Barnum, March 4, 1882  

3 22

From A.L. Baldwin, March 6, 1882  

3 23

From Mrs. Evander R. Hall, March , 1882  

3 24

From B.S. [?], March 6, 1882  

3 25

From George Benedict, March 7, 1882  

3 26

From N.R. Barnum, March 8, 1882  

3 27

From [?] H. Barnum, March 9, 1882  

3 28

From B.P. Parson, March 10, 1882  

3 29

From Granville Barnum, March 11, 1882  

3 30

From Henry P. Barnum, March 13, 1882  

3 31

From George Benedict, March 14, 1882  

3 32

From Roswell Smith, March 16, 1882  

3 33

From Roswell Smith, March 16, 1882  

3 45

From George Barnum, March 18, 1882  

3 35

From Jehitilan Lind, March 22, 1882  

3 36

From George Barnum, March 29, 1882  

3 37

From Dwight M. Baldwin, April 10, 1892  

3 38

From P. ___, April 17, 1882  

3 39

From Franklin Ball, April 23, 1882  

3 40

From Ellen Pain, May 9, 1882  

3 41

From A.D. Bartlett, Jun 7, 1882  

3 42

From A.V. Lichold, July 13, 1882  

3 43

From John Davis, August 14, 1882  

3 44

From Minnie Barnum, August 16, 1882  

3 45

From Mary Amermun, August 20, 1882  

3 46

From M. Baird, October 31, 1882  

3 47

From C.J. Bellknap, November 18, 1882  

3 48

From Mrs E. Sanford, January 25, 1883  

3 49

From General John A. Halderman, February 8, 1883  

3 50

From Eli C. Barnum, February 10, 1883  

3 51

From Whitelaw Read, march 5, 1883  

3 52

From M. Baird/Smithsonian Institution, April 3, 1883  

3 53

From R. Everett June 29, 1883  

3 54

From R.H. Belly, June 29, 1883  

3 55

From A. Agassis, June 1883  

3 56

From C.H. Shepherd, July 14, 183  

3 57

From Dr. John J. Brown, July 18, 1883  

3 58

From Unknown, July 24, 1883  

3 59

From Mrs. Jennie Raily, August 7, 1883  

3 60

From Pancoast and Manel, August 10, 1883  

3 61

From Julia R. White, August 19, 1883  

3 62

From Rev. W. Packard, August 20, 1883  

3 63

From Rev W. Winter, August 21, 1883  

3 64

From Thomas Smith Engineers, August 26, 1883  

3 65

From Henry A. Ward, August 29, 1883  

3 66

From Unknown, August 31, 1883  

3 67

From A. Clement, August 31, 1883  

3 68

From Rev. Dr. H.R. Howard, September 5, 1883  

3 69

From Mrs S.M. Perkins, September 5, 1883  

3 70

From Joaquin Miller, September 8, 1883  

3 71

From S. Marie Bevin, September 12, 1883  

3 72

From Gertie H. Green, September 15, 1883  

3 73

E. James, September 17, 1883  

3 74

From C.E. Dickson, September 22, 1883  

3 75

From V.B. Mullan, September 24, 1883  

3 76

From R.W. Carte, September 26, 1883  

3 77

From William Pool, September 30, 1883  

3 78

From Helen A. Edwards, September 1883  

3 79

From G. Bell, October 2, 1883  

3 80

From M.S. Guyon, October 18, 1883  

3 81

From Charles T. Root, october 18, 1883  

3 82

From L.L Rees, October 20, 1883  

3 83

From H. Husted, October 22, 1883  

3 84

From Willis and Nicholson, October 22, 1883  

3 85

From Alice Gardener, october 23, 1883  

3 86

From D[?], October 25, 1883  

3 87

From Mayor J.A. Miller, October 28, 1883  

3 88

From George B. Chamerlain, October 29, 1883  

3 89

From J.W. Denhart, October 2, 1883  

3 90

From O.C. Marsh, November 2, 1883  

3 91

From Clay E. Rolfe. November 7, 183  

3 92

From C.C. Lees, November 14, 1883  

3 93

From Lord Pelham Clinton, November 15, 1883  

3 94

From Edward Sansing Sattertoe, November 21, 1883  

3 95

From Archdeacon Dunbar; Sir Archibald Dunbar, November 29, 1883  

3 96

From Annie McCluskey, December 2, 1883  

3 97

From Andrew D. White, December 3, 1883  

3 98

From John W. Idle, December 5, 1883  

3 99

From Mrs. Emily Haviland Mead, December 6, 1883  

3 100

From S. Calkins, December 9, 1883  

3 101

From David Briggs, December 10, 1883  

3 102

From T.B. Zeller, December 17, 1883  

3 103

From Mrs. M.Y. Huff, December 12, 1883  

3 104

From Samuel Lockwood, December 18, 1883  

3 105

From M.A. McClaskey, 1883[?]  

3 106

From Saint Meinrad's Abbey, January 17, 1884  

4 1

From Samuel W. Barnum, January 18, 1884  

4 2

From William, January 22, 1884  

4 3

Saint Meinrad's Abbey, January 25, 1884  

4 4

From M.L. Race, January 29, 1884  

4 5

From Unknown, January 29, 1884  

4 6

From New York medical Aid and Relief Society, January 30, 1884  

4 7

From Henry Bergh, March 22, 1884  

4 8

From Samuel W. Barnum, September 2, 1884  

4 9

From C.F. Raymond, 1884  

4 10

From Robert G., October 1, 1885  

4 11

From C.A. Dana, April 5, 1887  

4 12

From Sarah Hatch, May 23, 1888  

4 13

From General Noble, May 6, 1889  

4 14

From Bobbi Burns, July 7, 1890  

4 15

From Rev T.W. Higginson, 18[??]  

4 16

From Mrs W.G. Hunter, January 25, [no year]  

4 17

From Mrs. C.F. Stan, March 8, undated  

4 18

From Catherine C. Hopley, August 8 [no year]  

4 19

From A.H. Hone, December 8, no year  

4 20

From Dwight W. Baldwin, undated  

4 21

From W. Mills, undated  

4 22

From Unknown, ticket request, undated  

4 23

From Unknown, genealogical information, undated  

4 24

Subseries C: Additional correspondence about Barnum business ventures; misc.  

4 25

From John Greenwood Jr. to H.B. Curtis and Co. August 14, 1854  

4 26

From John Greenwood Jr. to H.B. Curtis and Co. August 14, 1854  

4 27

Bank notes E.P. Nichols to Mrs. Curtis, 1855; p.T. barnum to E. T. Nichols 1855  

4 28

P.T. Barnum, copy of statement to prosecuting attorney, 1861  

4 29

From Geroge B. Bunnell to A. Steward, march 16, 1881  

4 30

From Morris B. Beardsley to George C. waldo, April 1, 1885  

4 31

From William __ to James A. Bailey, September 1, 1885  

4 32

From J.L. Hutchinson to James A. Bailey [telegram], September 16, 1885  

4 33

From Merrit Young to James A. Bailey, September 16, 1885  

4 45

From J.L. Hutchinson to james A. Bailey, September 16, 1885  

4 35

From Merrit Young and Joseph McCaddon to Mrs. James A. Bailey and T. McCaddon, September 16, 1885  

4 36

From Merrit Young to James A. Bailey [telegram] September 17, 1885  

4 37

From J.L. Hutchinson to James A. Bailey [telegram, reply on reverse], September 25, 1885  

4 38

From J.L. Hutchinson to James A. Bailey, September 25, 1885  

4 39

From J.L. Hutchinson to James A. Bailey [telegram], September 29, 1885  

4 40

From T.D. Rogers to Samuel Orcutt, December 12, 1886  

4 41

Signed by B. Fish. September 25, 1892  

4 42

From B. Fish to Orcutt, October 5, 1892  

4 43

From B. Fish to Orcutt, November 11, 1892  

4 44

From James A. Bailey to Frank Clark, January 21, 1896  

4 45

Letterhead, office of the Bridgeport Scientific Society, Samuel Orcutt, 189[?]  

4 46

From LMV to Mrs. A. Middlebrook, 189[?]  

4 47

Mary Barnum, quilt claim, 1741  

4 48

Envelope addressed to J.W. Knowlton, c. 1887-1889  

4 49

From W. Mills  

4 50

Typewritten letters to Nan, unsigned, undated  

4 51

Envelopes to George C. Waldo; Mary Bateman; R.B. Lacey; Trubee  

4 52

Letter to Whiteblosom, July 4, 1919, unsigned  

4 53

Letterhead and envelopes, 4 pieces, undated  

4 54

Letterhead, Barnum and Bailey, 189__  

4 55

Letterhead, Barnum and Bailey, 1870; 19__  

4 56

O.W. Thomas, about P.T. Barnum, July 4, 1877  

4 57

Signatures of Barnum on slips of paper, 1868  

5 1

Indentures (2), Henry W. Sergeants and wife Helen C. Olmstead to Barnum, 1837  

5 2

Bond, Nehemiah Dodge to Barnum for April 1-October 1, October 1, 1844  

5 3

Mortgage, Nehemiah Dodge to Barnum, October 18, 1844  

5 4

Indenture, February 1851  

5 5

Bond, Henry W. Sargent to Barnum, February 7, 1851  

5 6

Warranty deed for Barnum to Eli Dewhurst, June 10, 1876  

5 7

Acknowledgement receipt from Barnum to William Noble of $1 for loan by Washington Park to Methodist Episcopal church Board of Trustees, August 7, 1883  

5 8

Acknowledgement receipt from Barnum of $3500 for land on Fairfield Avenue from Charles E. Sanford, July 10, 1885  

5 9

Acknowledgement receipt from Barnum of $600 for land from William Randall, September 21, 1889  

5 10

Ledger, c. 1854  

5 11

Document, copy of marriage license to Nancy Fish, February 14, 1874  

5 12

Agreement between Bunell and Barnum, November 3, 1876  

5 13

Petition for harbor pilot application that includes Barnum’s signature, 1850  

5 14

Legal document photocopies, 1852; 1853  

5 15

Sample of Barnum’s printing work in Bethel CT, writ justice book c. 1831-1834  

5 16

Payment to Justice of the Peace Oliver Shepard by Lucius Booth, May 5, 1830  

5 17

Barnum on Temperance from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, July 24, 1875  

5 18

Booklet, “Why I Am a Universalist” by P.T. Barnum, undated  

5 19

Pages from “Struggles and Triumphs” featuring East Bridgeport and American Museum, undated  

5 20

Calling card from Mrs. Barnum to Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Trubee, undated  

5 21

Book, “The Last Chapter” by Nancy Fish Barnum, #40, 1893  

5 22

Barnum family legal documents, Samuel Barnum, August 18, 1735 (original and 19th century copy)  

5 23

Barnum family legal documents, Francis Barnum, August 18, 1735 (original and 19th century copy)  

5 24

Deed wrapping of Francis Barnum to his sons, August 19, 1763  

5 25

Barnum family legal documents, testimony of Captain Ebenezer Stevins et. al. August, 1763  

5 26

Barnum family legal documents, Francis Barnum deed, September 4, 1763, original and 19th century copy)  

5 27

Genealogy, general narrative, 4 pages, undated  

5 28

Genealogy, general narrative on Waldemere paper, c. 1880s  

5 29

Genealogy, Listing of marriage and deaths 1778-1868, intended for family Bible, undated  

5 30

Genealogy, Typed family history, undated  

5 31

Genealogy, “Genealogy of the Barnum Family in the United States, 1662-1874”  

5 32

Genealogy, “Genealogy of the Barnum and Taylor families” undated  

5 33

Genealogy, “Genealogy of the Barnum Family, Thomas - Nancy Fish, 1874”  

5 45

Genealogy, “List of papers concerning persons by the name Barnum found among the army rolls of the war of the Revolution” undated  

5 35

Genealogy, Darius Barnum, son of Seth, marriages and birth c. 1870s  

5 36

Genealogy, “Thomas Barnum-P.T.Barnum” by Frank Fransworth Starr, 1882  

5 37

Genealogy, Thomas Barnum  

5 38

Genealogy, List of children of Philo Barnum, undated  

5 39

Genealogy, Statement of service of Philo Barnum in Revolutionary War, June 25, 1890  

5 40

Genealogy, Question and answer sheet, undated  

5 41

Genealogy, Address of Mrs. A.S. Barnum, undated  

5 42

Check featuring Iranistan (one of Barnum’s homes), 1849  

5 43

Bank note, Pequonnock Bank, $5, 1856  

5 44

Check, Merchant’s Exchange Bank, April 13, 1858  

5 45

Oration on the Freedom of the Press, December 5, 1832  

6 1

P.T. Barnum 80th birthday invitation, July 5, 1890  

6 2

P.T. Barnum’s 80th birthday menu, June 2, 1874  

6 3

Program booklet to Welcome to Mr. P.T. Barnum to England, November 1889 1 of 2  

6 4

Program booklet to Welcome to Mr. P.T. Barnum to England, November 1889 2 of 2  

6 5

Memorial ribbon from P.T. Barnum’s funeral, April 10, 1891  

6 6

Memorial service program from Barnum’s funeral, April 10, 1891  

6 7

Barnum’s Will and Codicils, 1891, 1 of 2  

6 8

Barnum’s Will and Codicils, 1891, 2 of 2  

6 9

Obituaries, April 1891  

6 10

Funeral program for Barnum’s services, April 10, 1891  

6 11

Program for dedication of Barnum monument at Seaside Park, July 4, 1893  

6 12

Ribbon with Barnum on it from dedication of Barnum monument at Seaside Park, July 4, 1893  

6 13

Trade cards, “Every man rides his own hobby…” by Kash, c. 1870-1880  

6 14

Life of P.T. Barnum booklet posted in Duke’s Cigarettes, c. 1890  

6 15

Book, “The Last Chapter” by Nancy Fish, 1983  

6 16

Booklet, “To Perpetuate the name of P.T. Barnum” undated  

6 17

“Nouvel apercu de la vie de James A. Bailey” by James Bailey, 1988  

6 18

Music cover, National Poultry Show Polka, undated  

6 19

“Letter I Wish P.T. Barnum Had Written” by A.H. Saxon, undated  

6 20

Review of Barnum’s autobiography from Harper’s Monthly, 1855  

6 21

Clippings, undated  

6 22

Newspapers, single event listing, June 187  

6 23

Article, Barnum as Legislator from Harper’s Weekly, September 1926  

6 24

Article, discusses life and career, undated  

6 25

Subject files, Bridgeport Scientific Society Sixteenth Annual Course of lectures tickets, 1892-1893  

6 26

Subject files, programs for the Barnum Institute opening exercises, 1893  

6 27

Subject files, program for Bridgeport Scientific Society, 1888-1891  

6 28

Subject files, Scientific Society, piece of linen from mummy,undated  

6 29

Subject files, essay on circus, undated  

6 30

Subject files, guidebooks to Brighton, New Brighton, undated  

6 31

Subject files, History of American Clock Business, Life of Chauncey Jerome, New Haven, 1860  

6 32

Subject files, Seaside Institute, Announcement of plan and purpose, November 10, 1887  

6 33

Coin, celebrates the centennial of the circus and features a portrait of Barnum, 1970  

6 45

Illustrations of Barnum, young, 1820s-1850s  

6 35

Illustrations of Barnum, middle aged, c. 1850s-1870s  

6 36

Illustrations of Barnum, older, c. 1870s-1890s  

6 37

Illustrations, cartoons of Barnum; Barnum on a rail, Barnum five seconds ahead, undated  

6 38

Illustrations of Barnum’s homes, undated  

6 39

Illustrations of Barnum’s birthplace in Bethel, CT, c. 1869  

6 40

Illustration of fountain Barnum gifted to Bethel, CT, c. 1869  

6 41

Illustrations from ‘Struggles and Triumphs’, undated  

7 1

Photographs, Portraits of young Barnum, c. 1830s-1850s  

7 2

Photograph, Barnum leering at dancer, 1864  

7 3

Photographs, portraits of Barnum, middle aged, c. 1850s  

7 4

Photograph, portrait of Barnum, c. 1880 by Rockwood Studio, Union Square, NY  

7 5

Photograph, Portrait of Barnum, later years, by E.C. Betts studio, Bridgeport  

7 6

Photographs, portraits of Barnum, older, c. 1870s-1890s  

7 7

Photographs, portraits of Barnum from Schneider Collection, c. 1880s  

7 8

Photographs, P.T. Barnum and Hugh Brady (coachman)  

7 9

Photograph, Barnum in carriage at Waldemere (one of Barnum’s homes), undated  

7 10

Photograph, Barnum, Nancy Fish Barnum, Wander I. DeVer and Eva Warner, c. 1870s  

7 11

Photograph, Barnum family portrait, c. 1880s  

7 12

Photographs, Charity Barnum, undated  

7 13

Photographs, Nancy Fish, undated  

7 14

Photograph, Jim Bailey, Danbury newsman, 1878  

7 15

Photographs, Pauline Barnum. undated  

7 16

Photograph, Philo Barnum, 1875  

7 17

Photograph, Reverend Thomas K. Beecher  

7 18

Photographs, Lindencroft (one of Barnum’s homes), undated  

7 19

Photographs, Waldemere (one of Barnum’s homes), c. 1875  

7 20

Photographs, Waldemere (one of Barnum’s homes), undated  

7 21

Photographs, Barnum statues and plaques, undated  

7 22

Photographs, Universalist church on Fairfield Avenue  

7 23

Photographs, fountain in Bethel gifted to city by P.T. Barnum, undated  

7 24

Photographs from the film “The Mighty Barnum”  

7 25

Photograph negatives, undated  

7 26

Bethel ledger, with detailed accounts of Barnum's store keeping in the early 1830s then jumps to 1854 and receipts of the American Museum. Details also on the menagerie, insurance policies, and various letters and other documents, 1832-1833 (Held out of drawer) Restricted access.  

Drawer 1 1

Barnum deed to Isaac E. Keeler, land in East Bridgeport, September 28, 1853, accession 1978.07  

Drawer 1 2

Barnum lottery document, September 1, 1834  

Drawer 1 3

P.T. Barnum’s pocket diaries, 1883 and undated. Restricted access.  

Drawer 1 4

Barnum diary, 1889. Restricted access.  

Drawer 1 5

Barnum diary, 1890. Restricted access.  

Drawer 1 6

Salmagundi ledger, a highly eclectic group of documents. The contents are primarily but not exclusively business records --copies of letters, plans of vault at Mountain Grove Cemetery, receipts and routes of circuses, financial dealings, property transactions, etc. ,Restricted access.  

Drawer 1 7

P.T. Barnum’s personal account book, undated And Mason certificate.  

Drawer 1 8

Caroline Barnum Thompson’s diaries, handwritten, typed (2), 1848  

Drawer 1 9

Caroline Barnum Thompson’s diaries, handwritten, typed, printed, 1850-1851  

Drawer 1 10

Genealogy of the Barnum family, undated  

Drawer 1 11

Bound copy of Barnum’s Annual Address to Fairfield County Agricultural Society, 1849  

Drawer 1 12

PT Barnum to the public, responding to David W. Sherwood , April 5, 1875  

Drawer 1 13

Book, Running to Waste by George Baker, signed by Barnum to a grandchild for Christmas, 1874  

Drawer 1 14

New Haven Register, mock-up of full-page New Haven Register proof, biography of Barnum with art by Russ Jones, July 2, 1961  

Drawer 1 15

PTB Caricature from Vanity Fair by Leslie Ward (aka Spy), undated  

Drawer 1 16

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated News, PT Barnum at McLevy Hall, May 10, 1856  

Drawer 1 17

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated News, PT Barnum at McLevy Hall, May 10, 1856, cropped  

Drawer 1 18

Photograph, portrait of P.T. Barnum with signature, c. 1886, accession 2010.22  

Drawer 1 19

Phonograph recording, The Wonders of the Age / Mr. Edison’s New Talking Phonograph with PTB’s voice , undated  

Drawer 2 1

Herald of Freedom and Gospel Witness. Bethel: P.T. Barnum, v. 2, no. 8, December 5, 1832  

Drawer 2 2

P. T. Barnum's real estate sub-division to Denver, 1882  

Drawer 2 3

Bridgeport Hospital decree honoring P.T. Barnum, deceased president, 1891  

Drawer 2 4

Columbia Register, December 20, 1851  

Drawer 2 5

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, November 1, 1853  

Drawer 2 6

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, illustration of PTB and Lindencroft; illustration of PTB in Bridgeport’s Common Council, July 23, 1864  

Drawer 2 7

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, “Barnum at the Common Council meeting” July 24, 1875  

Drawer 2 8

New York Dramatic News, Barnum as moral agent, December 14, 1878  

Drawer 2 9

New York Dramatic News and Society Journal, part of a Barnum picture, December 14, 1878  

Drawer 2 10

Clippings, advertisement for “Barnum and Beaches’ Paper”, 1853  

Drawer 2 11

Life Illustrated, a Journal of Entertainment, Improvement, and Progress, “sympathy with Mr. Barnum,” Barnum’s financial difficulties” May 3, 1856  

Drawer 2 12

New Haven Palladium, Barnum vs. Hubbard, April 25, 1878  

Drawer 2 13

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, February 18, 1882  

Drawer 2 14

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, dinner given to P.T. Barnum by citizens of Bridgeport, July 11, 1874  

Drawer 2 15

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, Barnum’s ethnological congress, April 25, 1885  

Drawer 2 16

Ladies Home Journal, clippings about Nancy Fish-Barnum, February/March 1891  

Drawer 2 17

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, children at PTB’s burial, April 25, 1891  

Drawer 2 18

Various publications, April 1891  

Drawer 2 19

Grand Army of the Republic tribute to P.T. Barnum, 1891  

Drawer 2 20

Steel Engraving plate, Portrait of Barnum, undated  

Drawer 2 21

Map, Bethel CT from the Beers Atlas, undated  

Drawer 2 22

Illustration, Iranistan (one of Barnum’s homes) from newspaper, undated  

Drawer 2 23

Illustration, Iranistan (one of Barnum’s homes) from Gleason’s, undated  

Drawer 2 24

Illustrations, Iranistan (one of Barnum’s homes), undated  

Drawer 2 25

Illustration, Fairfield County Agricultural Society ploughing match, 1852  

Drawer 2 26

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, Illustrations of Waldemere and Seaside Park, August 29, 1874  

Drawer 2 27

Photograph, Lindencroft (one of Barnum’s homes), undated  

Drawer 2 28

Photograph, Waldemere (one of Barnum’s homes), 1868-1869  

Drawer 2 29

Photograph, Waldemere and Marina (one of Barnum’s homes) side by side, check date  

Drawer 2 30

Photograph, Barnum and elephants on Stratford Ave. bridge, check date  

Drawer 2 31

Negative print of Waldemere lithograph, undated  

Drawer 2 32

Barnum Polka by Theodore Eisfeld  

Drawer 2 33

Colored lithograph, Iranistan (one of Barnum’s homes), undated  

Drawer 2 45

Color illustration from Gleason’s, Iranistan (one of Barnum’s homes), 1857  

Drawer 2 35

Illustration, Waldemere (one of Barnum’s homes), undated  

Drawer 2 36

Photograph of Barnum  

Drawer 2 37

Photograph of Barnum  

Drawer 2 38

Newspaper, Columbia Register, November 19, 1847, feature on Iranistan  

Drawer 2 39

Return to Table of Contents »


Series II - American Museum 

boxfolder

Booklet, "An Illustrated Catalog and Guide Book to Barnum's American Museum" original and photocopy, c. 1850s  

8 1

Booklet, "A Historical Account of the Siamese Twin Brothers" 1831; 1834  

8 2

Note: Chang and Eng Bunker did not appear at the American Museum until later. However, they are included in this series because of their later exhibition there.  

8 3

Booklet, "Memoir of an Eventful Expedition" with the Aztec Children, 1850  

8 4

Booklet, "Life of the Living Aztec Children" 1860  

8 5

Booklet, "A Guide to Rapid and Accurate Computation By Professor Hutchins" c. 1860  

8 6

Booklet, “The Circassian Girl, Zalumma Agra, Star of the East” 1873  

8 7

Note: This was printed at the start of Barnum’s circus venture, but lists her as appearing at the American Museum. As a result, it has been kept in the American Museum series.  

8 8

Handbill, Brunhilda, September 14, 1863  

8 9

Tickets, American Museum tickets for Morning Concert, Wednesday November 13, no year c. 1860s  

8 10

Clippings, American Museum, 1851  

8 11

Clippings about the American Museum, 20th century  

8 12

Illustrations, American Museum on Broadway, 1850  

8 13

Illustration, Barnum's Museum on Sevenths and Chestnut, 1851  

8 14

Illustrations, front of American Museum circa 1850s-1860s  

8 15

Illustrations, American Museum interiors c. 1850s-1860s  

8 16

Illustrations, American Museum fire, 1865  

8 17

Photographs, Bates, Captain and Anna Swan undated  

8 18

Photographs, Bunker, Chang and Eng (Siamese Twins), undated  

8 19

Photographs, Campbell, Jane, undated  

8 20

Photographs, Jones, Annie, undated  

8 21

Photographs, American Museum performers, undated  

8 22

Negatives, American Museum building, undated  

8 23

Photographs, American Museum performers negatives, undated  

8 24

Handbill, Joice Heth, 1835  

Drawer 6 1

Barnum's American Museum handbills -1861 with the Living Hippototamus -Living Wonders, undated  

Drawer 6 2

Handbill, Barnum's American Museum Christmas and New Year Holiday Bill featuring the living whale and living hippopotamus, 1864 1 of 2  

Drawer 6 3

Handbill, Barnum's American Museum Christmas and New Year Holiday Bill featuring the living whale, the living hippopotamus, and white rats, 1864 2 of 2  

Drawer 6 4

Lithograph. Chang and Eng, age 18,second page has Siamese and Malay characters plus the English translation; a facsimile of part of a treaty between the English and Siamese. [B631.9], undated  

Drawer 6 5

Lithograph, Chang and Eng, 1839.  

Drawer 6 6

Lithograph, the Wonderful Eliophobus Family by Currier and Ives, 187-  

Drawer 6 7

Handbill, Siamese Twins for the Day Only, undated  

Drawer 6 8

Handbill, Franklin Hall Lecture Series at the American Museum, 1865  

Drawer 6 9

Engraving, American Museum, 1852  

Drawer 6 10

Norwich Weekly Courier, Ad for the American Museum, June 4, 1852  

Drawer 6 11

Norwich Weekly Courier, Ad for the American Museum, June 11, 1851  

Drawer 6 12

Norwich Weekly Courier, Ad for the American Museum, June 18, 1851  

Drawer 6 13

Norwich Weekly Courier, Ad for the American Museum, June 25, 1851  

Drawer 6 14

The New York Herald, Ad for the American Museum, July 23, 1853  

Drawer 6 15

Illustrated News, January 1, 1853  

Drawer 6 16

Frank Leslie's Illustrated newspaper, interior of the American Museum, 1853  

Drawer 6 17

Harper's Weekly, The Japanese Mermaid, February 4, 1860  

Drawer 6 18

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, feature about Barnum, April 7, 1860  

Drawer 6 19

Harper’s Weekly, Living Curiosities at Barnum’s Museum, December 15, 1860  

Drawer 6 20

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Great Conflagration in New York City, Ruins of Barnum's museum, July 29, 1865 FRAGILE  

Drawer 6 21

Life Illustrated, January 31, 1857  

Drawer 6 22

Harper's Weekly, burning of the American Museum, March 21, 1868  

Drawer 6 23

Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Fairy Wedding illustration, February 21. 1863  

Drawer 6 24

Foldered together (2 items) Clipping, Harper's Weekly, Holiday Street Fantasticals in New York City, January 12, 1867; Clipping, Harper's Weekly, Barnum's elephants in Winter Quarters, January 27, 1883  

Drawer 6 25

Foldered together (7 items) Harper's Weekly, Barnum's New Museum, July 17, 1880; -Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, Frightful collusion on the Housatonic Railroad new Bridgeport, Conn. September 2, 1865; Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, photographs and illustrations of Barnum's funeral, April 1891; Hearth and Home, Cottage at Seaside Park, February 27, 1869; Harper's Weekly, PT Barnum's The World in Contribution, March 29, 1875; Harper's Weekly, Barnum's New and Greatest Show on Earth, May 13, 1876; Harper's Weekly, Dayton Charity Circus, August 4, 1984  

Drawer 6 26

Gleason's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion, Spadling and Roger's floating circus palace, February 19, 1857  

Drawer 6 27

Photocopy, New York City scene showing museum building, undated  

Drawer 6 28

Illustration of American Museum on Broadway, New York by Avery, undated  

Drawer 6 29

Gleason's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion, undated FRAGILE  

Drawer 6 30

Gleason's Pictorial Drawing Room Companion, President passing through Broadway in front of American Museum, undated  

Drawer 6 31

Roxbury Gazette, article about Chang and Eng, October 10, 30, 1847  

Drawer 6 32

Gleason’s Pictorial Drawing-Room Companion, article about Chang and Eng, undated  

Drawer 6 33

Gleason’s Pictorial Drawing-Room Companion, feature about museum and emphasis on elephants, June 21, 1851  

Drawer 6 45

New York Weekly Tribune, article about burning of the American Museum, January 1, 1873  

Drawer 6 35

Return to Table of Contents »


Series III: Circus 1893-1993 

boxfolder

Barnum and Bailey account book belonging to J. McCaddon, 1881-1887  

9 1

Correspondence, James Bailey, October 6, 1902  

9 2

Catalogues of show property, 1875  

9 3

Catalogue of show property, 1894  

9 4

Check, 1917  

9 5

Circus performer scrapbook, “Life Story of Edwin Fritz Smith” 1918  

9 6

Handbill, Howard Hall, February 19, 1877  

9 7

Handbill, P.T. Barnum’s Greatest Show on Earth, 1878  

9 8

Handbill, P.T. barnum and London Shows at Madison Square Garden, March 13, c. 1880s  

9 9

Handbills (3), c. 1880s  

9 10

Handbill, “Approaching the Close” Barnum and London Shows at Madison Square Garden, c. 1880s  

9 11

Ticket, the Annex, c. 1870  

9 12

Invitation to Barnum's Hippodrome for the visit of King Kalakaua, December 1874  

9 13

Ticket, Barnum’s Greatest Show on Earth, Gilmore’s Garden, 1877  

9 14

Ticket, Barnum gymnasium exhibition, 1890  

9 15

Tickets, various venues, 1891-1918  

9 16

Courier, Barnum’s Greatest Show on Earth, FRAGILE, 1884  

9 17

Courier, Barnum and Bailey’s Greatest Show on Earth, Hartford, CT, June 14, 189  

9 18

rogram, Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth at Olympia, London, 1897  

9 19

Program, Barnum and Bailey, Coney Island spectacular Water Carnival and Clown Joker, December 26, 1898  

9 20

Program, Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth, America’s Naval Victory at Santiago, 1898  

9 21

Program, Barnum and Co.’s Greatest Show on Earth, 1898  

9 22

Program, Barnum and Bailey, Magazine of Wonders, 1903; 1906  

9 23

Program, Barnum and bailey, Magazine of Wonders, 1908  

9 24

Program, Barnum and Bailey, 1911  

9 25

Program and Libretto, Cleopatra, 1912  

9 26

Program, Barnum and Bailey, Greatest Show on Earth, Wizard Prince of Arabia at Missoula, August 11, 1914  

9 27

Program, Barnum and Bailey Circus and Crookstown, FRAGILE, 1915  

9 28

Program, Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey, 1952  

9 29

Booklet, Admiral Dot and the Bearded Girl [Annie Jones], 1873  

9 30

Booklet “History of Animals and Leading Curiosities contained in P.T. Barnum’s World’s Fair, 1874  

9 31

Booklet, “Life of General Mite” 1876  

9 32

Booklet, “History of Animals and Leading Curiosities” 1879  

9 33

Booklet, “History of Animals” c. 1882  

9 45

Booklet, “History of Animals” c. 1882-1885  

10 1

Booklet, “Little Grains for Little People.” 1885  

10 2

Booklet, “The Life and Adventures of Lord George Sanger” by George Sanger c. 1870s-1880s  

10 3

Booklet, “The Fall of Babylon,” 1890  

10 4

Booklet, “Nero; or the Destruction of Rome” 1890-1891  

10 5

Booklet, “Columbus and the Discovery of America” 1892  

10 6

Booklet, “Biographical Sketch of count and Countess Philippe Nicol” c. 1894  

10 7

Booklet, “Guide to Olympia, Barnum and Bailey's Great Show” 1897-1898  

10 8

Booklet, “Zeo the Air Queen” c. 1880-1900s  

10 9

Booklet, “Circus Realm” June 29, 1906  

10 10

Booklet, “Rhyme and Reason Truly” undated  

10 11

Booklet, “History and medical description of the two headed girl” (reprint) 1976  

10 12

Songster, P.T. Barnum’s Great Clown Songster, c. 1877  

10 13

Songster, Clown Songster for the 1879 season  

10 14

Songster, Barnum and Bailey songster, undated  

10 15

Souvenir, “Panorama of Barnum’s Roman Hippodrome” 1874  

10 16

Souvenir of Barnum and London 15 united shows, c. 1884  

10 17

Souvenir, Barnum and Bailey’s Greatest Show on Earth for Augusta, August 1, 1891  

10 18

Lunch car statement, October 1, 1916 and Barnum Circus puzzle, 1893  

10 19

Trade cards by J.A. Goffrey and Co.  

10 20

Pin, “The Great Barnum and Bailey Show” undated  

10 21

Commemorative wallet, undated  

10 22

Clippings, Harper’s Weekly, February 18. March 29, 1873; Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, 1870s-1880s  

10 23

Clipping, P.T. Barnum’s Roman Hippodrome, 1874 from Harper’s  

10 24

Clipping, Dan Rice to Adam Forepaugh in Chicago Evening Journal, 1879  

10 25

Article, “Human Cannonballs” by Fred D. Pfening from Bandwagon, November/December, 1976  

10 26

CBT advertisement with old Barnum advertisements on it c. 1980s  

10 27

Illustration, circus scenes, 1883-1884  

10 28

Illustration, Barnum’s Mammoth tent, undated  

10 29

Illustration, Greatest Show on Earth with hippos and seal, undated  

10 30

Illustration, cut out horse drawn carriage advertising Barnum’s greatest show on Earth, undated  

10 31

Illustration, Captain Costentenus, 1876  

10 32

Illustration, Millie Christine, the renowned two headed lady, 1880  

10 33

Illustrations, elephants, Barnum’s white elephant postcards, 1884  

10 45

Illustration, The Barnum and Bailey Circus Girl, 1905  

10 35

Illustration, circus carousel, c. 1911  

10 36

Photograph, Chang the Chinese Giant, undated  

10 37

Photograph, William Cody, “Buffalo Bill”  

10 38

Photograph, elephants, Head of Grace the Elephant, December 27, 1887  

10 39

Photographs, elephants, Hebe and Baby Bridgeport  

10 40

Photographs, elephants, Barnum and elephants on Stratford Avenue Bridge, 1889  

10 41

Photographs, elephants c. 1870s-1890s  

10 42

Photograph, Mammoth the Fat Boy, undated  

10 43

Photographs, Trapeze artist, male performer, name unknown, undated  

10 44

Photographs, circus performers, c. 1870s-1890s  

10 45

Photographs, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Middlebrook (Winter Quarters manager), undated  

10 46

Photograph, Barnum and Bailey Department of Prodigies at Olympia, London, 1898-1899  

10 47

Photograph, Mabel Stark wrestling with a tiger, undated  

10 48

Photograph of a Lillian Leitzel poster, undated  

10 49

Real estate ad with Barnum and plastic sheet map of properties for Barnum and Noble, undated  

10 50

Negatives for circus material  

10 51

Nancy Fish Barnum to Middlebrook, 1890  

11 1

Roberts to Middlebrook, July 31, 1891  

11 2

Roberts to Middlebrook, August 23, 1891  

11 3

H.B. Rennell to Middlebrook, March 1, 1895  

11 4

F.W. Rennell to Middlebrook, March 6, 1895  

11 5

D.W. Thompson to Middlebrook, March 7, 1895  

11 6

Funeral home bill sent to Middlebrook for W.F. Bishop, March 8. 1895  

11 7

Middlebrook death notice telegram from J. Fish to McCaddon  

11 8

Jessica Seeley Marshall to Middlebrook, July 9. 1895  

11 9

Mary L. Chasebrough to Dear Friend, August 14, 1905  

11 10

Illustrations of Baby Bridgeport, 1882  

11 11

Photographs of elephants at Winter Quarters, c. 1922; undated  

11 12

Winter Quarters buildings and grounds, building plan, c. 1927  

11 13

Winter Quarters buildings and grounds, illustrations, 1871-1927  

11 14

Winter Quarters buildings and grounds, postcard views, 1909; undated  

11 15

Winter Quarters buildings and grounds, railroad, 1871-1927  

11 16

Winter Quarters buildings and grounds, yard, 1871-1927  

11 17

Illustrations, Winter Quarters fire, 1927  

11 18

Photographs, aftermath of Winter Quarters fire, 1927  

11 19

Winter Quarters negatives, 1871-1927  

11 20

Booklet, RGN studio on the old grounds of Winter Quarters, undated  

11 21

Courier, P.T. Barnum's the World in Contribution for Taunton, New Bedford, Fall River, and North Bridgewater, May 7-10, 1873  

Drawer 8 1

Courier: P.T. Barnum's Great Traveling World's Fair for Boston, Mass., May 12, 1873  

Drawer 8 2

Courier, P.T. Barnum’s illustrated news, Bridgeport, CT, May 3, 1880  

Drawer 8 3

Courier: P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth and the Great London Circus for June 1, 1881, in Lowell, MA (red paper)  

Drawer 8 4

Courier: Barnum and London Eight United Shows at Madison Square Garden commencing Monday, March 26, 1882 [red paper]  

Drawer 8 5

Courier, “Book of Jumbo”, Newburyport, July 19, 1882  

Drawer 8 6

Courier: P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth combined with the Great London Circus for Jackson, August 28, 1884  

Drawer 8 7

Courier: P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth and Great London Circus for Bridgeport, Connecticut, 1885-1887 (white paper)  

Drawer 8 8

Courier: P.T. Barnum and Co's United Greatest Show On Earth, Sanger's Royal British Menagerie, Great London Circus, and Grand International Allied Shows for Newburyport, July 18, 1887  

Drawer 8 9

Courier: "Barnum's Wonders, an Illustrated History of the Hindoo Hairy Family and other prodigious and exclusive features of the Greatest Show on Earth" for Fall River, June 17, 1888  

Drawer 8 10

Courier: Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth and the Great London Circus for Lowell, July 5, 1889 [red paper]  

Drawer 8 11

Courier: P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth in London, November 11, 1889 (owned by the Bridgeport History Center) (color cover)  

Drawer 8 12

Courier: Fall of Babylon at Oakland Garden, Boston, June 30, 1890 [red paper]  

Drawer 8 13

Courier: Barnum and Bailey's Greatest Show on Earth for Madison Square Garden, beginning Thursday night on March 26, 1891 [yellow paper]  

Drawer 8 14

Courier: Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth for Lowell on May 22, 1891  

Drawer 8 15

Courier: The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth for Lowell, Mass., June 22, 1891 [red paper]  

Drawer 8 16

Courier : The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth, Imre Kiralfy's Columbus and the Discovery of America for Jersey City, Monday, May 2, 1887; Bridgeport, Monday May 29, 1892; Newark New Jersey on May 4-5, 1892 [red paper and blue paper]  

Drawer 8 17

Courier: the Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth for Madison Square Garden, March 28, 1895, featuring a "New Ethnological Congress of Strange and Savage People"  

Drawer 8 18

Courier: The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth, "The World Its Field" for Bridgeport, Friday, June 19, 1903[?]  

Drawer 8 19

Courier: Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show, "Joan of Arc", for Saturday, August 10, 1912  

Drawer 8 20

Courier, Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on earth and the Gorgeous Indo-Arabic 1250 Character Oriental Wordlessly Play the Wizard Prince of Arabia, 1914  

Drawer 8 21

Courier: Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth, "New Superb Spectacle Cleopatra" c. 1910s  

Drawer 8 22

Courier: Barnum and Bailey's Greatest Show on Earth for Bradford, Friday, September 18, [check year] [reproduction]  

Drawer 8 23

Program: Dan Rice's Paris Pavilion circus, New York, September 25, 1871  

Drawer 8 24

Program: The Arena in New York City for Monday, November 18, 1872  

Drawer 8 25

Program: P.T. Barnum's Great Roman Hippodrome bill of the performance for the week ending November 21, 1874  

Drawer 8 26

Program: P.T. Barnum's Great Roman Hippodrome bill of the performance for the week ending April 3, 1875  

Drawer 8 27

Program: P.T. Barnum's Great Roman Hippodrome, 1875  

Drawer 8 28

Program: P.T. Barnum's Daily Show Program for Boston, Mass., 1876  

Drawer 8 29

P.T. Barnum’s Daily Program, May 15, 1880  

Drawer 8 30

Program: P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth and the Great London Circus at Madison Square Garden, March 25, 1882  

Drawer 8 31

Program: Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth and Great London Circus at Madison Square Garden, 1884 [red paper]  

Drawer 8 32

Program: Barnum and London 9 Jumbo Shows United for Madison Square Garden, April 22, 1886  

Drawer 8 33

Program: P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth combined with the Great London Circus [...] for Madison Square Garden, 1888  

Drawer 8 45

Program: P.T. Barnum’s Greatest Show on Earth,…Great London Circus. Combined, for the N.Y .season only, with Adam Forepaugh’s, 1887  

Drawer 8 35

Program: Barnum and Bailey's 15 New United Shows[...] Madison Square Garden Regular Programme, 1889  

Drawer 8 36

Program: P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth and Great London Circus for Lowell, Mass. or Boston, Mass, 1889 [pink paper]  

Drawer 8 37

Program: Barnum and Bailey's Greatest Show on Earth for Boston, Mass, Lowell, Mass, and Madison Square Garden, New York, 1891 [orange paper] [extremely fragile]  

Drawer 8 38

Program: The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth official program for Nashua, New Hampshire, July 3, 1893 [red paper]  

Drawer 8 39

Program: The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth for Boston, June 11-16, 1894, [range paper]  

Drawer 8 40

Program: The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth for Madison Square Garden beginning April 19, 1897, orange paper  

Drawer 8 41

Program: The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth, the Newly Added Cleopatra, for Spokane, Monday. August 12, 1912  

Drawer 8 42

Handbill: Dan Rice's Circus, "This Very Monday, January 11, for Kemp's Benefit, nothing but fun and frolic." January 11, 1871  

Drawer 9 1

Handbill: "P.T. Barnum's Great Travelling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan...", 1871  

Drawer 9 2

Handbill: P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth and the Great London Circus, Sanger's Royal British Menagerie and Grand International Allied Shows performing in Bath, Maine, on June 15, 1881.  

Drawer 9 3

Handbill: "The Towering Giant Consolidation! P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth and the Great London circus" for 1881 featuring Chang the Chinese Giant  

Drawer 9 4

Handbill: "Better Wait for Jumbo and the Entire United 8 Monster Shows" with blank space for show location, 1882-1885  

Drawer 9 5

Handbill: "Barnum and London, Barnum Returns No More" Lowell, Mass., for June 22, 1884 featuring Jumbo [yellow paper]  

Drawer 9 6

Handbill: "P.T. Barnum's Great Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan, and Hippodrome..[and]...Dan Costello's Mammoth Circus....Opinions of the American Press" 1884  

Drawer 9 7

Handbill :"The Great and Only Barnum and London 10 United Monster Exhibitions" with emphasis on excursion rates, July 25, 1887  

Drawer 9 8

Handbill: "Madison Square Garden Inauguration of the Hippodrome Season", 1887  

Drawer 9 9

Handbill: The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth for Anderson, Ind. July 9, 1890 featuring the racetrack at Olympia on one side and Nero or the Destruction of Rome on the other [green paper]  

Drawer 9 10

Handbill: Barnum, Bailey and Hutchinson's Barnum and London Shows for Lowell, Mass. Friday July 11, 1884 featuring the Sacred White Elephant and Jumbo on both sides  

Drawer 9 11

Handbill: "The P.T. Barnum and J.A. bailey Greatest Show On Earth [...] and with it Imre Kiralfy's Nero" for Springfield, July 18, 1890  

Drawer 9 12

Handbill: The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Shows on Earth for Reading, May 14, 1891 with red and black ink, featuring "Cheap Excursions from All Ponits" and "Hands Across the Sea" on one side and "Nero or the Destruction of Rome" on the other  

Drawer 9 13

Handbill: The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth for Lowell, Monday, June 22, 1891 featuring the interior of the Greatest Show on Earth on one side and Nero or the Destruction of Rome on the other [yellow-green paper]  

Drawer 9 14

Handbill: The Barnum and Bailey Greatest Show on Earth for Woonsocket, June 20, 1893 featuring Imre Kiralfy's Columbus on both sides, plus acrobats [green paper] (2 COPIES)  

Drawer 9 15

Handbill: "Truth! [...] Compare! [...] Great London Circus and P.T. Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth" for Monday, May 1, in Buffalo, New York [yellow paper]  

Drawer 9 16

Handbill: "Aladdin and his Wonderful Lamp" written in Hebrew, playing at Madison Square Garden, April 7-14, 1917  

Drawer 9 17

Program notes for Brattleboro Vermont, July 21, 1885 and Lowell MA, July 22, 1885  

Drawer 10 1

Barnum and Bailey circus route sheets for 1892; 1910; 1912  

Drawer 10 2

Children’s book, "P.T. Barnum's Circus with text and illustrations arranged for little people” by P.T. Barnum and Sarah J. Burke, 1888  

Drawer 10 3

Children’s book, removed pages from “P.T. Barnum's Circus with text and illustrations arranged for little people” by P.T. Barnum and Sarah J. Burke, 1888  

Drawer 10 4

Children’s book, "Barnum’s Great Show", 1889  

Drawer 10 5

Children’s book, “The Great American Menagerie “  

Drawer 10 6

Object, Gold belt buckle made by Tiffany and Company commemorating the 1908 circus season  

Drawer 10 7

Film canister containing a catalog of circus items sold at auction, 1894  

Drawer 10 8

Illustration, Roman Hippodrome in Madison Square Garden from the Daily Graphic, March 5, 1874  

Drawer 10 9

Illustration, Roman Hippodrome interior from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, May 9, 1874  

Drawer 10 10

Illustration, various circus animals at the winter quarters in Bridgeport, Connecticut from Harper’s Weekly, February 18, 1882  

Drawer 10 11

Illustration, Bathing elephants in Central Park from Harper’s Weekly, August 21, 1886  

Drawer 10 12

Enlarged copies of Illustrations taken from an unknown program or courier, c. 1880s-1900s  

Drawer 10 13

Scrapbook, Circus Book pictures and articles pertaining to the American Museum and later period circus material, 1850s-1938  

Drawer 10 14

Fragment, Daily Mirror and American, “Barnum is Coming”, June 8, 1878 *  

Drawer 10 15

Fragment, various newspaper fragments, undated  

Drawer 10 16

Fragment, various newspapers, handbills, and couriers, undated  

Drawer 10 17

Newspaper, Harper’s Weekly, October 4, 1879  

Drawer 10 18

Newspaper, ad taken from Cooley’s Weekly, June 4, 1887  

Drawer 10 19

Newspaper, Boston Herald featuring the Hippodrome, July, 1874  

Drawer 10 20

Newspaper, Daily Mirror and American featuring the Hippodrome, May 28, 1875  

Drawer 10 21

Newspaper, Free Press [Burlington VT] , June 27, 1879  

Drawer 10 22

Newspaper, The Hartford Globe, May 24, 1885  

Drawer 10 23

Newspaper, New York Tribune, December 7, 1887  

Drawer 10 24

Newspaper, New York Family Story Paper, supplement, December 24, 1887  

Drawer 10 25

Newspaper, The Daily Graphic, an illustrated evening newspaper, March 23, 1889  

Drawer 10 26

Newspaper, Feature on Madison Square Garden from the New York Times, May 21, 1967  

Drawer 10 27

Newspaper, History of Madison Square Garden from the New York Times, February 14, 1968  

Drawer 10 28

Article, Madison Square Garden through the Ages from unknown source, undated  

Drawer 10 29

Article, The Glory of the Circus Parades, by T.F.Magner, undated  

Drawer 10 30

Photograph: Carl Claire’s Military Band [12 ½” x 17 ¼”] from Schneider Collection, 1889-19899  

Drawer 10 31

Photograph: Circus in Hungary [12 ½” x 16 ¼”] from Schneider Collection, undated  

Drawer 10 32

Photograph, circus elephants at winter quarters in Bridgeport, Conn, copy 1, undated  

Drawer 10 33

Photograph, circus elephants at winter quarters in Bridgeport, Conn, copy 2, undated  

Drawer 10 45

Return to Table of Contents »


Series IV: Jumbo  

boxfolder

Ad for Barnum's Greatest Show on Earth featuring Jumbo c. 1880s  

12 1

Billy Burke's Jumbo Songster c. 1881  

12 2

Jumbo trade cards by J.H. Bufford's Sons, 1882  

12 3

Advertising trade cards with Jumbo c. 1800s  

12 4

The New York Receipt Book featuring Jumbo on page 21, 1883  

12 5

Keer and Co Cord ad with Jumbo and "The History of Jumbo" c. 1800s  

12 6

Spool cotton thread ad with Jumbo, c. 1880s  

12 7

The Story of Jumbo by W.F. L. Edwards, 1935  

12 8

Jumbo's Jolly Tales, unknown author. Circa 20th century  

12 9

The Tuftonian, volume 1, number 2, January 1941  

12 10

Clippings related to Jumbo's death, 1885  

12 11

Clippings, 1959; 1982  

12 12

Jumbo picture clippings, 1881, 1882, n.d  

12 13

Illustrations, Jumbo in park in London c. 1870s  

12 14

Illustrations, Jumbo from various sources, c. 1884; undated  

12 15

Illustrations, Jumbo's departure from London and arrival (includes negatives) c. 1880s  

12 16

Photographs, Jumbo as a child with Matthew Scott  

12 17

Photographs, Jumbo with Matthew Scott in zoo setting  

12 18

Photographs, Jumbo with Matthew Scott, c. 1879s-1885  

12 19

Photographs, Jumbo, dead, September 15, 1885  

12 20

Photographs, Jumbo's Skeleton at the Museum of Natural History, 1950s  

12 21

Photographs, Jumbo mounted prior to Tufts  

12 22

Photographs, Jumbo at Tufts, c. 1940s-1950s  

12 23

Photographs, Jumbo's successor at Regent Park Zoo, undated  

12 24

Newspaper, New York Family Story Paper, supplement, December 24, 1887  

12 25

Newspaper, The Daily Graphic, an illustrated evening newspaper, March 23, 1889  

12 26

Newspaper, Feature on Madison Square Garden from the New York Times, May 21, 1967  

12 27

Newspaper, History of Madison Square Garden from the New York Times, February 14, 1968  

12 28

Article, Madison Square Garden through the Ages from unknown source, undated  

12 29

Article, The Glory of the Circus Parades, by T.F.Magner, undated  

12 30

Photograph: Carl Claire’s Military Band [12 ½” x 17 ¼”] from Schneider Collection, 1889-19899  

12 31

Photograph: Circus in Hungary [12 ½” x 16 ¼”] from Schneider Collection, undated  

12 32

Photograph, circus elephants at winter quarters in Bridgeport, Conn, copy 1, undated  

12 33

Photograph, circus elephants at winter quarters in Bridgeport, Conn, copy 2, undated  

12 45

Box with circle of Jumbo's tusk c. 1885, tip of Columbia's tusk  

Drawer 7 1

Jumbo trade cards (52), n.d  

Drawer 7 2

Jumbo plate, undated  

Drawer 7 3

Baby Bridgeport statue  

Drawer 7 4

"Jumbo" a ballad from Young Ladies Journal, May 1, 1882  

=Drawer 7 5

Sheet music, Jumbo march, undated 1 of 2  

Drawer 7 6

Sheet music, Jumbo March, 2 of 2  

Drawer 7 7

Cut outs of Jumbo c. 1880s  

Drawer 7 8

England’s Loss is America’s Gain,c. 1882  

Drawer 7 9

The London Illustrated News, Arrival of the White Elephant from Burmah and illustrations of Jumbo, January 26, 1884  

Drawer 7 10

Illustration, the White Elephant, 1884  

Drawer 7 11

Photographs, Jumbo dead on tracks  

Drawer 7 12

Magazine, the Animal World, April 1882  

Drawer 7 13

Return to Table of Contents »


Series V: Jenny Lind  

boxfolder

Correspondence, outcoming from Lind, c. 1847-1858; undated  

13 1

Correspondence, incoming to Lind, undated  

13 2

Correspondence, Felix Mendelssohn Bartoldy to Gustav Naunberg regarding Lind, February 8, 1846  

13 3

Correspondence, David Shaw, Lind’s P.R. Manager, October 5, 1850  

13 4

Letter, to or from H.W. Jewett, c. 1850-1851  

13 5

Manuscript, ‘Jenny Lind At Last’ (play?) by Baron, undated  

13 6

Program, Tremont Temple, Boston, c. 1850  

13 7

Program, Tripler Hall, November 7, 1850  

13 8

Program, Tripler Hall, November 14, 1850  

13 9

Program, Gran Teatro de Tacon, January 13, 1851  

13 10

Program, May 9, 1851  

13 11

Program, the Melodeon, June 18, 1851  

13 12

Program, (photocopy), July 5, 1851  

13 13

Program, Mrs. Otto Goldschmidt, May 21, 1852  

13 14

Program, undated  

13 15

Jenny Lind celebrating Christmas with Hans Christian Andersen copy, undated  

13 16

Advertisements for Lind concerts at Theatre Royal, London; Royal Amphitheatre, 1847, FRAGILE  

13 17

Tickets, various Lind concerts, 1850-1851  

13 18

Book, “Jenny Lind: Ein Skizze ihres Lebens” 1846  

13 19

Book, “The Life of Jenny Lind...her genius, struggles, and triumphs” by C.G Goldschmidt, 1850  

13 20

Book, “Life of Jenny Lind” by G.C. Foster, 1850  

13 21

Book, “Flowers of Literature and Ladies Keepsake” 1850  

13 22

Book, “Jenny Lind’s Tour through America and Cuba, 1851  

13 23

Booklet, “Jenny Lind Comic Almanac” 1851  

13 24

Book, “Jenny Lind, her vocal art and cadence” 1894  

14 1

Sheet music, Jenny Lind Album c. 1850s  

14 2

Sheet music, “Metropolitan songster” c. 1850s  

14 3

Song book, “Jenny Lind Songster and Ethiopian Melodist” undated  

14 4

Song book, “The Swedish Nightingale Songster” undated  

14 5

Bank notes with Lind on them (5), c. 1850s  

14 6

Booklet with article on Lind, page 79, “Pictorial National Library” 1849  

14 7

Booklet with article on Lind, “Woodsworth’s Youth’s Cabinet” vol 5. No. 4, April 1850  

14 8

Clippings, magazine articles, 1851-1852; undated  

14 9

Clippings, contemporary to Lind, includes concert information and marriage information, c. 1850s-1890s  

14 10

Clippings, arrival in America and first concert, September 1850  

14 11

Clippings, reviews, 1850s  

14 12

Clippings, related to Lind and Hans Christen Andersen, 1928; undated  

14 13

Clippings, brief biographies, 1947; mid 20th century  

14 14

Clippings, related to various Lind anniversaries, 1949; 1970; undated  

14 15

Clippings, biographical articles, 1968-1970, undated  

14 16

Clippings, citations of various articles on Lind, undat  

14 17

Illustration, Lind, published by John Neale, undated  

15 1

Illustration, Lind, engraved by J,C. McRae, undated  

15 2

Illustration, Lind in La Sonnambola (character role), 1847  

15 3

Illustration, Jenny Lind as Alice at Her Majesty’s Theatre, August 26, 1848  

15 4

Illustration, portrait of Jenny Lind around age 18, by J. Fagerplan  

15 5

Illustration, Lind by W. C. Wrankmore  

15 6

Illustration, portrait of Jenny Lind by Edward Mangus, 1862  

15 7

Illustration, Lind, Belletti, and Benedict, c. 1850s  

15 8

Illustration first lessons from the Nightingale, c 1850  

15 9

Illustration, portrait of Lind by Zeichnung von. O Sodermark, undated  

15 10

Illustration, young Lind with sheet music,undated  

15 11

Illustration, painting of Lind by L. Asher, undated  

15 12

Illustrations, Lind, young, undated  

15 13

Photograph, daguerreotype of Lind c. 1850s-1860s  

15 14

Illustrations, Lind from daguerreotype, various engraver. c. 1850s-1860s  

15 15

Illustration, older Lind by W. B. Closson, 1881  

15 16

Illustrations, Lind, older, undated  

15 17

Photographs, Lind, older, undated  

15 18

Illustrations, Lind being welcomed to America in New York City, 1850  

15 19

Illustration, Lind performing at Castle Garden fro Orcutt, c. 1887  

15 20

Illustration, Lind’s home, undated  

15 21

Illustrations, exterior of Castle Garden, c. 19th century  

15 22

Illustrations, interior of Castle Garden, c. 19th century  

15 23

Photograph, statue of Lind in Stockholm, c. 1930s  

15 24

Photographs and illustration of bust of Lind by J. Durham, c. 1880s and 20th century  

15 25

Photographs, negatives for images in Lind series  

15 26

Photograph, Leni [name?] as Lind in the CBS program “You Are There”, April 10, 1955  

15 27

Ah! Don’t Mingel, One Human Feeling. Composed by Bellini, undated  

Drawer 3 1

Annie Laurie, undated  

Drawer 3 2

The Birds’ Song. Composed by M. Taubert, undated  

Drawer 3 3

[Be Watchful and Beware] The Song of the Gipsy, undated.  

Drawer 3 4

By the Sad Sea Waves. Composed by J. Benedict (3 copies), undated  

Drawer 3 5

Comin’ thro’ the Rye. (2 copies), undated  

Drawer 3 6

Cradle Song, undated  

Drawer 3 7

Deux Rondinos – Polkas: #2 Jenny Lind. Jenny Lind’s Favorite Polka. With variations by Czerny, undated  

Drawer 3 8

Dodge's literary museum vol 9 no 22, November 4, 1854  

Drawer 3 9

The Dream. From the original of Frederica Bremer adapted by Carl Muller (3 copies),undated  

Drawer 3 10

The Evening Breeze. (Gently Sighs the Breeze.) music by Stephen Glover, undated  

Drawer 3 11

The Gipsy Polka. Composed by Leutner, undated  

Drawer 3 12

Grand Valse de Caprice. Composed by Theod. Von La Hache, undated  

Drawer 3 13

Herd Song, the Celebrated Echo Song, undated  

Drawer 3 14

Homage à Jenny Lind. Composed by Carl Lobe, undated  

Drawer 3 15

I Will Never Wend From Three. Arranged by Charles M. King, undated  

Drawer 3 16

I’ve left the Snow-Clad Hills. Music by G. Linley (3 copies), undated  

Drawer 3 17

Jenny Lind’s English Polka. Composed by Ricardo Linter, undated  

Drawer 3 18

Jenny Lind's Fashionable Songster, undated  

Drawer 3 19

Jenny Lind’s Favorite Polka. Arranged by N.P.B. Curtis, undated  

Drawer 3 20

Jenny Lind’s Favorite Serenading Polka or the National Schottisch. Arranged by H.P. Weller, undated  

Drawer 3 21

Jenny Lind’s Greeting to America. Composed by Julius Benedict, undated  

Drawer 3 22

Jenny Lind’s Last Night in England. English words by Charles Jeffreys, undated  

Drawer 3 23

Jenny Lind’s Salutation to America. Music by M. Strakosch , undated  

Drawer 3 24

Jenny Lind’s Swedish Mountain Bells. Composed by John Barnett, undated  

Drawer 3 25

The Jenny Lind Mania. Written by W.H.C. West [literary magazine, back page], undated  

Drawer 3 26

Jenny Lind Melodist by William H. Murphy, undated  

Drawer 3 27

Jenny Lind Newspaper, F. Gleason, Boston, undated  

Drawer 3 28

Jenny Lind Polka. Arranged by a. Wallerstein, undated  

Drawer 3 29

Jenny Lind Polka. Arranged by Allen Dodworth (7 copies), undated  

Drawer 3 30

Jenny Lind Polka. Arranged by N. Andrew Baldwin, undated  

Drawer 3 31

Jenny Lind Waltz. Music by Ludwig Hagemann, undated  

Drawer 3 32

Les Ideales. Composed by Charles Grobe (2 copies), undated  

Drawer 3 33

Lindianna or Jenny Lind’s Dream Waltz. Composed by Carl Lobe, undated  

Drawer 3 45

The Lonely Rose. Music by M.W. Balfe, undated  

Drawer 3 35

The Little Golden Ring by Robert Schumann, undated  

Drawer 3 36

Love Smiles No More. Music by Berg (2 copies), undated  

Drawer 3 37

The Mountaineer’s Song, undated  

Drawer 3 38

My Home My Happy Home. Music by G.A. Hodson (6 copies), undated  

Drawer 3 39

My Heart With Fond Emotion. Music by Donizetti, undated  

Drawer 3 40

Ossian’s Serenade. Music by Ossian E. 8. Dodge (2 copies) [cover only located]  

Drawer 3 41

The poetry by J. Wrey Mould, undated  

Drawer 3 42

A Ride I Once Was Taking. Composed by Fred. Kucken, undated  

Drawer 3 43

The Sea King’s Bride. Music by Ahlstrom (2 copies), undated  

Drawer 3 44

Seek Not to Know the Future. Music by Charles W. Clover, undated  

Drawer 3 45

The Serious Family Polka, undated  

Drawer 3 46

Sheet music covers, undated  

Drawer 3 47

Sheet music  

Drawer 3 48

Somnambulist’s Song. Words by Charles Jefferys (1 copy), undated  

Drawer 3 49

Song of the Gipsy, Seek not to know the future, Charles W. Clover, undated  

Drawer 3 50

Songs of Germany, Sung by Mlle. Jenny Lind: Ah, Lovely, Lovely Maiden Covers of sheet music, without the music – all in one covers, undated  

Drawer 3 51

Songs of Mademoiselle Jenny Lind, undated  

Drawer 3 52

Soul of My Blessed Adored One, undated  

Drawer 3 53

Souvenir de Jenny Lind. #4 Theme de Lucrezia Borgia, undated  

Drawer 3 54

Sounds So Entrancing. Composed by Andrea’s Randel, undated  

Drawer 3 55

The Swedish Carrier Dove. Arranged for guitar by M. Zorer, undated  

Drawer 3 56

The Swedish Star Polka. Composed by J.T. Treakell (2 copies), undated  

Drawer 3 57

Take this Lute. Composed by Jules Benedict (2 copies), undated  

Drawer 3 58

Tis the Last Rose of Summer. ch: Charles Grobe, undated  

Drawer 3 59

Welcome Jenny Lind in America. Composed by Francois Stuckler, undated  

Drawer 3 60

Winter Warm’d Into Showers, undated  

Drawer 3 61

A Set of Jenny Lind’s Songs Arranged for the Piano, undated : I’ve Left the Snow Clad Hills; The Stars of Heaven are Gleaming; The Sea Kings Bride; Farewell My Fatherland ; My Home My Happy Home  

Drawer 3 62

Child of the Regiment, music by Donizetti, undated : Child of the Regiment. (4 copies); Theme de L’Infant du Regiment; Salut à La France. (2 copies)  

Drawer 3 63

Farewell Songs of Jenny Lind in America (set), undated: Comin’ Thro the Rye. (2 copies); The Last Rose of Summer; Home Sweet Home.  

Drawer 3 64

Set, undated: The Stars of Heav’n are Gleaming; The Sea Kings Bride; Farewell My Fatherland; My Home My Happy Home  

Drawer 3 65

Set, undated: My Heart With fond Emotion; Lament For Home; The Camp Was My Home; Swedish Nightingale  

Drawer 3 66

Set, undated : Olison's serenade; La Fille du Régiment; Bird Song; My Home, My Happy Home  

Drawer 3 67

Plate, undated  

Drawer 4 1

Brooch, undated  

Drawer 4 2

Buttons with Lind, undated  

Drawer 4 3

Illustration, Lind with Belleit  

Drawer 4 4

Illustration, Lind at Castle Garden, undated  

Drawer 4 5

Illustrations, Linden taken from various song sheets, undated  

Drawer 4 6

Book, Fran Delaware till Garbo, Swedish publication with Lind and Barnum illustrations, 1938  

Drawer 4 7

Dodge's Literary Magazine, "Jenny Lind Mania" Nov 4, 1859  

Drawer 4 8

Etude, May 1938, Lind on cover  

Drawer 4 9

Etude covers, 1913  

Drawer 4 10

Jenny Lind illustrations, see listing  

Drawer 4 11

Gleason, Jenny Lind and Castle Garden, 1850  

Drawer 4 12

Program and ticket from first concert at Castle Garden, September 11, 1850  

Drawer 4 13

Illustration, Jenny Lind after life by Wolf  

Drawer 4 14

Illustration, lithograph of Jenny Lind,  

Drawer 4 15

Articles: September 3, 1850; The Illustrated London News, Reception of Jenny Lind in NY , September 21, 1850; The Illustrated London News, Jenny Lind in NY [large illus], September, 28 1850; The Illustrated London News, Jenny Lind in NY [illus], October 5, 1850; The Illustrated London News, Jenny Lind in NY , November 2, 1850; The Illustrated London News, Advertising in the United States , November 23, 1850; The Illustrated London News, Last Concert in NY, December 7, 1850; The Illustrated London News,Madame Goldschmidt at Exeter Hall [illus], December 22, 1855; The Illustrated London News, Baltimore Appearance, December 28, 1850; Norwich Weekly Courier, Farewell Visit to NY , May 28, 1851; Illustrated News of the World, Jenny Lind’s Life as an Artist [illus] , June 6, 1891; The Illustrated London News, NYC Firemen’s Testimonial [illus] , June 21, 1851; The Illustrated London News, Hartford Crowd Situation, July 26, 1851  

Drawer 4 16

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Series VI: Charles S. Stratton and M. Lavinia Warren  

boxfolder

Stratton autographs and Warren autographs, December 28, 1878  

16 1

Handbill, Stratton as Tom Thumb at the Brooklyn Institute, 1860, FRAGILE  

16 2

Handbill, Courthouse in Po’keepsie, August 26 and 27 c. 1850s-1860s  

16 3

Handbill, (copy) for Stratton at Egyptian Hall, Piccadilly, c. 1844  

16 4

Ticket, General Tom Thumb’s Entertainment, undated  

16 5

Handbill copy, Stratton, Warren and others at Central Music Hall c. 1870s  

16 6

Handbill reproductions from Mabel Leigh Hunt c. 1954  

16 7

Calling card , Mr. and Mrs. Stratton, February 19, no year  

16 8

Book, “Sketch of the Life of...Charles Stratton…” 1849  

16 9

Book, “Life and Travels of Tom Thumb…” 1849  

16 10

Book, “Sketch of the Life of General Tom Thumb…” 1852  

16 11

Book, “Sketch of the Life of General Tom Thumb…” 1854  

16 12

Book, “Sketch of the Life….Charles S. Stratton” 1859  

16 13

Book, “A Sketch of the Life of Charles S. Stratton, Personal Appearance….” 1863  

16 14

Book, “Sketch of the Life of Charles S. Stratton…” 1867  

16 15

Book, “Sketch of the Life of Charles S. Stratton…” 1869  

16 16

Book, “Gen. Tom Thumb’s 3 Years Tour Around the World” 1 of 2, 1872  

16 17

Book, “Gen. Tom Thumb’s 3 Years Tour Around the World” 2 of 2, 1872  

16 18

Book, “Sketch of the Life, Personal Appearance...of Charles S. Stratton…” 1874  

16 19

Book, “The History of Tom Thumb” from Aunt Louisa’s series, 1875  

16 20

Book, Madame Tussaud and Son’s catalogues, 1878; 1886  

16 21

Book, “The Story that Never Grows Old” by Benjamin J. Bump, 1953  

16 22

Book, MGM Presents: Tom Thumb, the great big story about a daring little man” [comic book], 1958  

16 23

Book, “Reading the Wonders of Tom Thumb” undated  

17 1

Book, “The American General Tom Thumb” undated  

17 2

Book, “Grandmama Peases’s General Tom Thumb” undated  

17 3

Book, “Life of Gen. Tom Thumb” undated  

17 4

Book cover, “Barnum Presents: General Tom Thumb” by Alice Curtis Desmond, undated  

17 5

Title page proof for “Have You Seen Tom Thumb” by Mabel Leigh Hunt, 1942  

17 6

Paperdoll, Stratton as Tom Thumb by McLaughlin Bros. c. 1860s  

17 7

Clipping about paper dolls of Stratton, Nutt, and others, March, 1952  

17 8

Stratton as Tom Thumb by Charles Baugniet, 1844  

17 9

Print of Stratton painting by R. R. Reinagle  

17 10

Illustration, Stratton as Tom Thumb under the patronage of Her Majesty the Queen  

17 11

Illustrations, Stratton as Tom Thumb in costumes from the 1861 Currier and Ives, painted over print, 1 of 2 , c. 1860s (1, 2, 3)  

17 12

Illustrations, Stratton as Tom Thumb in costumes from the 1861 Currier and Ives, painted over print, 2 of 2, c. 1860s (1, 2)  

17 13

Illustrations, Stratton as Tom Thumb in costumes from the 1861 Currier and Ives, center image. 1860s  

17 14

Illustration, Stratton as Tom Thumb in his carriage, undated  

17 15

Illustrations, Stratton’s life by E. Sears, undated (1, 2, 3, 4, 5)  

17 16

Photograph of daguerreotype of Stratton and man thought to be his father, c. 1842  

17 17

Photograph of daguerreotype of Stratton as Napoleon, c. 1843  

17 18

Photograph, Barnum and young Stratton, c. 1850s  

17 19

Photograph, Barnum and Stratton, stereo option, undated  

17 20

Photograph, Stratton as Tom Thumb in Scottishand Napoleon costumes; with Abraham Lincoln, done in Norwalk, C.T., c. 1850s  

17 21

Photograph, Stratton as Tom Thumb in Sailorand Napoleon costumes done in Norwalk, C.T., c. 1850s  

17 22

Photograph, Stratton in suit leaning on column, 1856  

17 23

Stereograph, Stratton c. 1860s  

17 24

Carte de Visite, Stratton as Tom Thumb  

17 25

Photograph, Stratton performing in Scotsman costume  

17 26

Photograph, Stratton in Knights Templar uniform by George T. Burnham of Middleboro, MA, undated  

17 27

Photograph, Stratton, older, possibly with his father ,undated  

17 28

Photograph, Stratton, Warren, and a baby  

17 29

Photograph, Stratton and Warren, older, together on a balcony  

17 30

Photograph, older Stratton and Warren beside a bed (bed now held by Barnum Museum), c. 1870s-1880s  

17 31

Photograph, Stratton’s Grave at Mountain Grove Cemetery, undated  

17 32

Photograph, Stratton’s home in Bridgeport, CT, undated  

17 33

Photograph, Stratton’s carriage, undated  

17 45

Photographs, items owned by Stratton including a violin, undated  

17 35

Handbill, advertising the Fairy Wedding, 1863  

18 1

Fairy Wedding sheet music greeting cards, 2009  

18 2

Fairy Wedding clippings, undated  

18 3

Illustrations, Stratton and Warren taking their vows, 1863  

18 4

Illustrations, Fairy Wedding party with Barnum, 1863  

18 5

Illustration, the Fairy Wedding by Currier and Ives, 1863  

18 6

Photographs, Stratton and Warren taking their vows, 1863  

18 7

Photographs, the Fairy Wedding party, 1863  

18 8

Individual wedding portraits of Stratton and Warren, 1863  

18 9

Cartes de Visite of the Fairy Wedding, 1863  

18 10

Cartes de visite from the Fairy Wedding Album, 1863  

18 11

Trade card, Stratton and Warren in front of the crowned heads of Europe, c. 1860s-1870s  

18 12

Photograph, Stratton, both Warrens, and Nutt recreating costumes worn in front of Queen Victoria, undated  

18 13

Photograph, Nutt, Stratton, and both Warrens playing cards, undated  

18 14

Correspondence, from Lavinia Warren to Margaret Donnelly, undated  

18 15

“Some of my Life Experience” typewritten manuscript by Lavinia Warren c. 1880s-1900s  

18 16

Postcard signed by Warren and Count Primo Magri, c. 1890s-1900s  

18 17

Wedding invitations to Warren’s marriage to Primo Magri, 1891  

18 18

Handbill (copy), Warren and Magri performing, c. 1890s-1900s  

18 19

Individual portraits of Warren, 1860s-1900s  

18 20

Photographs, Warren with Primo and Ernesto Magri, c. 1890s  

18 21

Photograph, Warren and Magri in Middleboro, MA, c. 1890-1900s  

17 22

Photographs, items belonging to Warren, undated  

18 23

Photograph, Mrs. Bump, Lavinia and Minnie Warren’s mother, undated  

18 24

Photographs, Minnie Warren and husband Edward Newell, c. 1860s-1870s  

18 25

Clippings, George Washington Morris Nutt, undated  

18 26

Carte de Visite, George Washington Morris Nutt, c. 1860s  

18 27

Carte de Visite, Nutt and Minnie Warren, c. 1860s  

18 28

Photograph, Barnum and Nutt, undated  

18 29

Portraits, Nutt, undated  

18 30

Photograph, Little people visiting Stratton’s grave, undated  

18 31

Negatives, Stratton  

18 32

Negatives, the Fairy Wedding, 1863  

18 33

Negatives, Stratton and Warren  

18 45

Negatives, Warren  

18 35

Handbill, General Tom Thumb at Lycem Hall, Lynn, July 27 and 28, no year.  

Drawer 5 1

Book, General Tom Thumb's 3 Years Tours Around the World by S. Bleeker, 1872  

Drawer 5 2

Book, Life and Travels of Tom Thumb, 1849  

Drawer 5 3

Book, The History of Tom Thumb from Aunt Louisa's series, 1875  

Drawer 5 4

Book, History of General Tom Thumb, undated  

Drawer 5 5

Book cover and promo items, The Autobiography of Mrs Tom Thumb with an introduction by A.H. Saxon, c. 1980s?  

Drawer 5 6

Token with Stratton on it, 1846  

Drawer 5 7

Medallions featuring Stratton, (3), undated  

Drawer 5 8

Sheet music, Fairy Wedding Waltz. Music by J.W. Turner (3 copies), undated  

Drawer 5 9

Sheet music, Tom Thumb’s Polka. Composed by W. Mardon, undated  

Drawer 5 10

Sheet music, General Tom Thumb Quadrilles, undated  

Drawer 5 11

The Christian Intelligencer, October 12, 1844  

Drawer 5 12

Norwich Courier, Article about Stratton, January 20, 1857  

Drawer 5 13

Harper's Weekly, full paper, June 27, 1863  

Drawer 5 14

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, February 28, 1863  

Drawer 5 15

Clipping, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, departure after Fairy Wedding, November 9, 1864  

Drawer 5 16

Clipping, Sunday News, "They Were the World's Littlest Lovers" November 7, 1957  

Drawer 5 17

Clipping, Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, fruit basket and cake, February 28, 1863  

Drawer 5 18

Photocopy of Stratton lithograph by Day and Haghe, 1844 (accession 1974.09)  

Drawer 5 19

Photocopy of Stratton as a child with his father, undated  

Drawer 5 20

Illustration, L'Admiral Tom Puce, 1852  

Drawer 5 21

Illustration, General Tom Thumb and Wife, Comm. Nutt and Minnie Warren, undated  

Drawer 5 22

Illustration, Fairy Wedding lithograph by Currier and Ives  

Drawer 5 23

Illustration, Tom Thumb as a child by J/ Baillie, c1844.  

Drawer 5 24

Illustration, Gen. Tom Thumb as he appeared before her Majesty Queen Victoria. (backed on heavy cardboard), undated  

Drawer 5 25

Framed illustration of Stratton sitting on sofa and Warren holding a baby, undated  

Drawer 5 26

Box contained 3 tintypes of Stratton, Warren, and Nutt, undated  

Drawer 5 27

Tintypes of Slybester Bleeker and unknown man  

Drawer 5 28

Tinype of Fairy wedding,  

Drawer 5 29

Small lead statue of Stratton, undated  

Drawer 5 30

2 sheets of clippings about Fairy Wedding#236/3.50  

Drawer 5 31

New York Herald, March 15, 1847  

Drawer 5 32

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, January 17, 1868  

Drawer 5 33

The Illustrated London News, December 17, 1845  

Drawer 5 45

Harper’s Weekly, February 21, 1863  

Drawer 5 35

Illustration, Collage frame of General Tom Thumb in his Characters, now performing with Barnum’s Traveling Museum and Menagerie  

Drawer 5 36

Posters for Tom Thumb Weddings, October 28, 1926; October 4, 1840  

Drawer 5 37

Harper’s Weekly, February 2, 21, 1863, Fairy Wedding cover  

Drawer 5 38

The Fairy Wedding Album - ACCESS RESTRICTED Due to the fragile nature of the Fairy Wedding Album, access to it is restricted. A full digital copy is available online.  

Special oversized housing 1

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